One Way To Draw Backgrounds Through Rain-Covered Windows

2016 Artwork Rain Covered Windows drawing article

Well, for today, I thought that I’d talk very briefly about a simple traditional drawing technique that I discovered when making one of the paintings that will be posted here later this month.

This was one of those times when I was making the preliminary sketch for a painting and suddenly thought “wouldn’t it be interesting if I tried this?” Only to later discover a new drawing or painting technique.

Anyway, I’ll be talking about how to draw backgrounds that can be seen through rain-covered windows. Even though I worked out a “realistic” way of doing this back in late 2014/ early 2015, it relied heavily on using digital tools after scanning the original painting (eg: the “smudge” tool in GIMP if anyone is interested). This is what my old digital technique looked like:

"Shuffle" By C. A. Brown [17th January 2015]

“Shuffle” By C. A. Brown [17th January 2015]

But, I was curious about whether a similar technique can be achieved through traditional means. It can, but the technique I used is a lot more subtle and a lot less instantly noticeable than simply blurring/ smudging the background digitally.

In fact, it’s very similar to the technique that most artists use when drawing objects that have been submerged in water. In other words, all you have to do is to make all of the lines in your drawing slightly wavy. After you’ve done this, then all you need to do is to add the usual thin diagonal lines in order to signify that it’s raining.

However, unlike when underwater objects, you want to make the wavy lines a lot more subtle. In other words, just make the lines slightly wavy rather than very wavy. Here’s a quick chart that I knocked up in MS Paint to show you what I mean.

[CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE] As you can see, the lines need to be slightly less wavy than those used for drawing underwater objects.

[CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE] As you can see, the lines need to be slightly less wavy than those used for drawing underwater objects.

In addition to this, it might also be worth using techniques similar to those used for drawing and/or painting foggy landscapes. Namely that the further away from the foreground something is, the lighter and blurrier it should be. I forgot to use these techniques when I was experimenting with drawing rainy windows, but I can see how it might be useful.

Anyway, here’s an example of the technique in action – taken from the painting that I’ll be posting here later this month. Although I made my usual digital adjustments to the brightness/contrast/ saturation levels in this picture (as well as covering up a couple of small mistakes), I didn’t use any digital blurring effects:

This is a detail from an upcoming painting. Notice how the edges of the brown building are wavy/blurry, in order to simulate rain on the window in front of it.

This is a detail from an upcoming painting. Notice how the edges of the brown building are wavy/blurry, in order to simulate rain on the window in front of it.

As I said, I didn’t use any “fog” techniques in this painting and the “rainy window” effect is also not really as noticeable as it would be if I’d used digital blurring techniques instead. But, it was still an interesting learning experience and it might be something that is worth experimenting with if you’re making traditional art.

————————

Sorry for another ridiculously short article, but I hope that this was useful đŸ™‚

Advertisements

One comment on “One Way To Draw Backgrounds Through Rain-Covered Windows

  1. […] Well, I was more in the mood for science fiction art when I made today’s digitally-edited painting. Plus, when I was sketching this painting, I worked out a rather interesting drawing technique (the article I wrote about it earlier this month can be read here). […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s