Finding The Right Type Of “Easy” Art To Make When Making Art Feels Difficult

One of the annoying things that can something happen if you practice making art regularly is that you’ll have times where making art seems like an extreme hassle. This can be due to things like feeling uninspired, being in a rush or being tired. It can also be caused by other factors such as the weather or the mood that you happen to be in.

But, rather than just repeating my usual list of techniques for dealing with this type of problem, I thought that I’d go into much more detail about one of them. I am, of course, talking about making “easy” paintings.

Every artist has their own definition of what an “easy” piece of art is and this will often depend on what is causing you to feel unenthusiastic about making art. So, the real trick is knowing which types of “easy” art work well in different situations.

For example, the night before I wrote this article – I was tired, in a slightly bad mood, in a bit of a rush and the hot weather had rendered me somewhat lethargic. But, I still wanted to keep up with my daily art practice. So, I decided to make a painting that involved relatively little artistic detail. Here’s a reduced-size preview of it:

The full-size painting will be posted here on the 3rd April.

Although I was able to disguise this somewhat with my choices of lighting, colours, subject matter etc.. the fact remains that I chose a painting that required little time and little effort. It was a painting where I only had to bother adding detail to about a quarter to a third of the total area of the picture.

However, when I was feeling both uninspired and very slightly short on time a few nights earlier, I did something a bit different. Since I had the energy for a more detailed painting, but didn’t have the time or inspiration to come up with an original idea, I decided to paint a study of an out-of-copyright painting called “The Day Dream” by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Here’s a reduced-size preview:

The full-size painting will be posted here in early April.

I had the energy and enthusiasm to add more detail to this picture, but I didn’t have to worry about coming up with a totally new idea. So, this painting was fairly “easy” to make in this context since copying an out-of-copyright painting meant that I completely bypassed the problem of not having the time or inspiration to come up with a new idea.

I did something a little bit different the day before I made this painting. The problem that night was that I just didn’t have the time to develop an idea for a painting. I had about an hour to make the painting, but I felt enthusiastic about making art and wanted to make some vaguely good-looking art. So, what did I do ? I made a still life painting of some of the random stuff on the desk in front of me. Here’s a reduced-size preview:

The full-size painting will be posted here on the 31st March.

Since I’ve practiced still life painting before, it was fairly straightforward. I could just quickly copy the scene directly in front of me, which allowed me to focus on things like lighting and realistic artistic detail whilst also allowing me to draw and paint a lot more quickly (since I didn’t have to waste time working out what to draw or choosing a colour palette).

On another occasion, the problem was entirely due to hot weather (and, yes, I write these articles and make daily paintings quite far in advance of publication). In this case, I was feeling inspired and I had a little bit more time. However, about halfway through the line art stage of making a painting, I was starting to feel drained and overwhelmed by the heat. But, I needed to finish this painting! So, instead of the detailed background I’d originally planned to add, I quickly added a fairly basic wall to the background instead (and covered about two-thirds of it with shadows). Here’s a reduced-size preview:

The full-size painting will be posted here on the 2nd April.

Yes, none of these paintings are as good as the kind of thing that I’d make during a more inspired, awake, relaxed etc.. day. But, they are finished paintings. They are paintings that actually got made, despite obstacles and problems. And this is all due to choosing the right type of “easy” art to make, depending on the problem I was faced with.

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Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂

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2 comments on “Finding The Right Type Of “Easy” Art To Make When Making Art Feels Difficult

  1. The title to your post drew me to read on. The idea of having something “easy” to do when life gets tough resonates with my own observations. Unless I determine in advance what are the minimum-effort “tasks” or “projects” or “creative ideas” I can attend to when not fully energised, I’ll end up wasting time. And worse: I’ll end up wasting what might later turn out to have been a seed for a great idea… Creative endeavours often depend on an element of luck, and the only way to increase the odds of getting lucky is to keep at it whenever possible, be it light or dark on the inside.

    • pekoeblaze says:

      Thanks 🙂 You’re totally right – one of the best ways to stay inspired (most of the time) is to keep making stuff as often as possible, even if it’s more “low effort” stuff sometimes.

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