Personal Humour And Creative Inspiration – A Ramble

[Ooops! Sorry about the late article everyone. I accidentally scheduled it for the same time as today’s art post.]

Well, for today, I thought that I’d talk about the value of personal humour in the creative process. When I talk about “personal humour”, I mean things that you find hilarious for no real reason, in-jokes amongst friends, amusing thoughts and this kind of thing.

I was reminded of this when I was making a slightly random and stylised self-portrait painting. The idea for this picture came to me when I was playing a set of fan-made “Doom II” levels and I suddenly thought “Wouldn’t it be hilarious if there was a Caravaggio-style painting of someone playing ‘Doom II’?

After all, famous historical artists like Caraviaggio, Manet etc… would occasinally paint what would have been ordinary scenes from everyday life. But, of course, these “ordinary” paintings revered as famous works of art today. So, the idea of doing a “modern” version of this just seemed too funny. Here’s a preview of the self-portrait:

This is a reduced-size preview. The full-size painting will be posted here on the 13th November.

But, why is personal humour such a great source of creativity?

The first reason is that it usually involves thinking about familiar things in different ways. Usually, an in-joke or a personal joke appears when something is compared to or combined with something else. It often involves, for example, combining something serious with something silly. Or it involves applying a particular viewpoint to something different. In short, it prompts different and original thought – however weird or random it may be.

The second reason is that other people won’t always get the joke. Although this may seem like a bad thing, it doesn’t have to be. Usually even the weirdest of personal jokes has some kind of logic behind it. So, even if your audience think about it in a “serious” way, then things inspired by a personal joke will come across as “unique” or “quirky” rather than “incomprehensible”. As such, it can add personality to your creative works.

The third reason is because a good personal joke makes you want to laugh more. It’s the sort of funny thing that you don’t want to forget. As such, this feeling can make you want to immortalise the joke in a drawing, story, comic etc… Or even to make something else, so that you can sneak the personal joke into it. So, personal jokes can be a great driving force for actually making stuff.

The fourth reason is that personal humour is usually completely unfiltered and uncensored. Although this means that you might not be able to directly translate it into something that can be published or posted online, it does at least put you in a more irreverent frame of mind (and this feeling of irreverent rebelliousness can prompt creativity). Plus, trying to work out a way to turn said personal jokes into something publishable can be an interesting creative challenge in it’s own right.

The fifth reason is that personal humour encourages you to be more “well-read”. In short, the more things that you’ve seen/read/played, the more material there will be for your imagination to surprise you with via amusing thoughts (by comparing things). And whilst this can be an obvious source of inspiration for parodies, it can also provide the beginnings of more original ideas too.

Finally, having random amusing thoughts is usually the sign of a healthy imagination. So, it’s usually a good sign that you’re feeling inspired.

—————

Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂

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2 comments on “Personal Humour And Creative Inspiration – A Ramble

  1. storyspiller says:

    True. I’m always comparing things to novels or books that I’ve read and my creativity is always blooming. It’s honestly hilarious because I see things that people do and it’s just amusing for me.

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