Review: “Bound To Me” By Jocelynn Drake (Novella)

Fairly soon after I had finished reading Jocelynn Drake’s amazing “Dark Days” series (you can find my reviews of it here, here, here, here, here and here ), I was in a rather melancholy mood. This amazing series was at an end and I missed it.

And then I remembered that there was a prequel novella called “Bound To Me” – and, after looking online, I realised that there was actually a paperback edition of it out there πŸ™‚ So, no prizes for guessing what I’ll be reviewing today.

However, although “Bound To Me” is a prequel to the ‘Dark Days’ series and can be read as a (mostly) self-contained story, it’s worth reading the entire “Dark Days” series before you read this novella. This is because a lot of references, character cameos etc.. will make more sense if you’ve read the other novels first.

So, let’s take a look at “Bound To Me”. Needless to say, this review will contain some SPOILERS.

This is the 2012 Harper Voyager (US/Can ?) paperback edition of “Bound To Me” that I read.

The novella begins in London during some unspecified period of history (implied to be the 19th century). The red-haired vampire Mira and her beloved, Valerio, are having an entertaining evening causing scandal at an aristocratic dinner party. Afterwards, they return home to spend some quality time together. However, they are soon interrupted by a mysterious visitor who carries a message from the vampire coven.

According to the messenger, both Mira and Valerio have been summoned to Venice because the coven has an important mission for them……

One of the first things that I will say about this novella is… wow! It is quite literally a miniature “Dark Days” novel πŸ™‚ There’s a good mixture of Machiavellian vampire politics, steamy romance, interesting locations and even a couple of brief action-thriller moments too. It is literally a small “Dark Days” novel and reading it felt just like returning to something warm and familiar again.

And, yes, there’s a lot of wonderfully familiar stuff here. Not only do we get to see more of Mira and Valerio’s backstory, but a few other familiar faces turn up too. We get to see Jabari, Elizabeth, Sadira and Macaire. We also get to visit the vampire coven in Venice again too πŸ™‚ Plus, to my surprised delight, Tabor and (what is implied to be) a younger version of Ryan also show up too πŸ™‚ Alas, no Danaus though – even though he would have, technically, been alive at the time the novel’s story takes place.

In terms of the story, it’s actually a proper story too. It has a beginning, a middle and an end. It includes character development, multiple locations, a plot twist and a (romantic) sub-plot too. Seriously, it’s great to see a full story that is so efficiently concise. It puts many other modern authors (and their bloated 400-600 page novels) to shame. Plus, the story is just as compelling as you would expect a full-length “Dark Days” novel to be too πŸ™‚

My only minor criticisms of this novella are the relative lack of horror elements (there are a few, but not many), the spelling of “Doncaster” as “Duncaster” and the fact that the story contains relatively little suspense. After all, if you’ve read the “Dark Days” novels, you’ll already know who survives and who doesn’t. In a lot of ways, I’d have preferred to see a sequel that dealt with what happens to Mira and Danaus some time after the dramatic ending of “Burn The Night”. But, still, this is an extra “Dark Days” story and this is never a bad thing πŸ™‚

In terms of the narration and writing, it is as good as you would expect. For the most part, Mira’s first-person narration still sounds pretty similar to the rest of the “Dark Days” series, although she’s a slightly more violent and emotional character in this novel (since she’s 100-200 years younger). The narration is very readable and even the bedroom-based scenes (which aren’t for the prudish) are well-written enough to ensure that there are no moments of unintentional comedy.

In terms of length, the novella itself is 94 pages long ( although the book is longer, because there’s a 21-page preview of another novel added to the end). This length is absolutely perfect, since it means that “Bound To Me” can be read in an hour or two in a similar fashion to watching a TV show episode. There’s no need to rush, you can just sit back and savour every page and not have to worry about how long it’ll take you to read the entire thing. Seriously, if publishers want to make reading popular again, then why are print novellas so rare these days? They’re literally the book equivalent of a TV show episode or something.

All in all, this novella is absolutely wonderful πŸ™‚ If you’re a fan of the “Dark Days” series, then you’ll have a lot of fun with this book. Although the actual story is less than 100 pages long, it still reads a lot like a full novel too – which is amazing πŸ™‚ Seriously, I wish more people would publish novellas. Plus, of course, this novella is something to take the edge off of that miserable “there’s no more “Dark Days” novels left!” feeling when you finish reading “Burn The Night”.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get at least four and a half.

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