Today’s Art (31st July 2019)

Well, I was still in the mood for retro 1970s-style gothic horror art and, although today’s digitally-edited painting wasn’t quite as detailed as I’d originally planned, it turned out better than I’d expected 🙂

As usual, this painting is released under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND licence.

“The Ghastly Greenhouse” By C. A. Brown

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Top Ten Articles – July 2019

Well, it’s the end of the month and this means that it’s time for me to do my usual thing of collecting a list of links to the ten best articles about writing, art, books etc.. that I’ve posted here over the past month. As usual, I’ll also include a couple of honourable mentions too.

This month’s articles turned out fairly well, although there were more articles about writing than about making art (this seems to be something of a trend over the past few months). Plus, this month also saw a comic-format article (linked at the top of the list later in this article) too – seriously, it has been years since I last made one of these 🙂

Likewise, I also ended up reviewing fourteen books this month and, to my delight, also read more sci-fi novels than usual too 🙂

My favourite books from this month’s reviews are probably: “Nova Swing” by M. John Harrison, “The Accidental Time Machine” by Joe Haldeman, “Ghost Dance” by Rebecca Levine, “Blood Music” by Greg Bear, “What Could Possibly Go Wrong?” By Jodi Taylor and “The Ice Queen” by Alice Hoffman.

Anyway, here are the lists 🙂 Enjoy 🙂

Top Ten Articles – July 2019:

– ” ‘Books – A Comic’ By C. A. Brown” (Comic)
– “Three Reasons Why Authors Write Books That Are ‘Difficult To Read’
– “Three Things To Do When You Worry That Your Short Story Is ‘Badly Written’
– “Good Stories Always Have ‘Deleted Scenes’ – A Ramble
– “Three Basic Tips For Making Your Thriller Story More Gripping
– “Three Thoughts About How To Use Multiple Story Threads
– “How To Use Misdirection In The Horror Genre – A Ramble
– “Three More Tips About When To Abandon A Short Story Project
– “One Clever Way To Make Minimalist Art Interesting (With An Example)
– “Three Tips For Writing Bleak Fiction (That People Will Actually Want To Read)

Honourable Mentions:

– “Three Beginners’ Tips For Writing Heavy Metal-Themed Stories
– “Awesome Art Can Lurk In Unlikely Places – A Ramble

Three Thoughts About How To Use Multiple Story Threads

Well, when the longer short story project (which I probably won’t post here) that I was writing at the time of writing this article started to turn into a larger story than I expected, I suddenly realised that I needed to split it up into chapters and to add a second story thread to it too.

If you’ve somehow never heard of this before, it is where – for example- the odd-numbered chapters of a story focus on one storyline and the even-numbered chapters focus on a different, but related, storyline. If you’ve read a few novels published within the last few decades, you’ve probably seen at least one example of this.

So, I thought that I’d look at some of the things that you can do with multiple story threads. And, yes, whilst these can be applied to different types of stories, they are best suited to stories that use third-person narration (which can easily jump between locations and characters without confusing or annoying the reader).

1) Emotional contrast: One interesting thing that you can do with multiple story threads is to give each one a slightly different emotional tone. For example, you could have a story where one plot thread contains more serious drama and the other contains more comedy.

Not only does this provide more variety for both you and your readers, but this contrast also means that each chapter evokes stronger emotions because it is contrasted with the chapters before and after it.

This is a fairly old technique which goes all the way back to the “Grand Guignol” theatre of the 19th and 20th centuries. I saw a recreation of this at the Abertoir festival in 2009 and the interesting thing was that, between two horrifying, shock-filled short plays, there was an utterly silly comedy play. This comedy play meant that the terrifying melodrama of the play directly after it was twice as shocking because – a few minutes earlier – you were laughing.

So, yes, this is an old technique. But it works really well 🙂

2) Mini-cliffhangers: I’ve talked about this before, but multiple story threads are an essential part of the thriller and horror genres because they allow for lots of mini-cliffhangers.

Simply put, if you end a chapter with a small cliffhanger of some kind, then the reader has to read through the next chapter – which contains your second storyline- before they can see how the cliffhanger is resolved. Of course, the chapter that the reader has to get through in order to find out “what happens next” can also contain a mini-cliffhanger of it’s own, which pushes the reader to read the next chapter etc….

If you’ve ever read a modern thriller novel, you’ve probably seen some version of this technique and, along with things like shorter chapters and a more “matter of fact” writing style, it is one of the things that makes these novels so gripping. But, of course, it can also be used in a slightly more subtle way in stories in other genres too.

3) Depth, variety and redundancy: Although each chapter should be relevant to the story you are telling, multiple plot threads allow you to add a lot more variety and background detail to your story. After all, if you are showing two related storylines that are happening in different locations, then this makes the “world” of your story feel larger and more expansive.

In addition to this, multiple story threads give both you and your readers some variety too. Having two slightly different storylines can allow you to take a break from each one at regular intervals, which means that you’ll be less likely to get bored of your story or feel uninspired by it. The same can be true for your readers as well.

Plus, another advantage of multiple story threads is that they give your story a certain level of redundancy too. In other words, if your reader doesn’t like one of your story threads, then they’re probably going to keep reading for the simple reason that a better story thread is just a chapter or two away.

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Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂

Review: “Blood Music” By Greg Bear (Novel)

Well, when I was going through a bit of a sci-fi phase a week or two ago, I looked online for sci-fi novels and Greg Bear’s 1985 novel “Blood Music” caught my interest enough for me to order a second-hand copy. And I’m glad that I did 🙂

So, let’s take a look at “Blood Music”. Needless to say, this review may contain SPOILERS.

This is the 2001 Gollancz (UK) paperback edition of “Blood Music” that I read.

The novel begins in California, where a socially-awkward scientific genius called Vergil Ulam is working for a bio-tech company called Genetron. He has been doing some secret research into using blood cells as mini-computers. However, his boss finds out about the research and orders him to destroy it. Infuriated by this, Vergil saves a sample of his altered cells (which he calls “noocytes” – thinking cells) and begins plotting revenge against the company.

Unfortunately for Vergil, his hack into the company’s computer system is discovered and he barely has time to inject himself with the last sample of noocytes before he is thrown out of the building. He isn’t sure what to do next and ends up in a bar, where a beautiful woman called Candice somehow feels attracted to him. To both of their surprise, he is remarkably good in bed.

That isn’t all, Vergil also seems to be getting thinner and healthier too. At first, he considers his experiment a success and tries to get work at another lab in the hope that he can extract and use the noocytes whilst they are still alive. But, after the hack, he has been blacklisted by the industry. Not only that, the noocytes start having strange effects on Vergil’s body and it soon becomes obvious that Vergil has accidentally created a sentient virus. A sentient virus that has already started spreading…..

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is… Wow! Although this novel takes a while to really get started, it is amazing 🙂 It is atmospheric, intelligent, compelling and awe-inspiring 🙂

This is one of those books that almost feels like a trilogy of novels compressed into one. It is a book that, whilst it might challenge you at times, has a surprisingly emotional payoff if you stick with it (seriously, the ending actually made me cry). It’s a novel that I probably didn’t entirely understand, but understood enough about to be amazed by it. Although this novel also contains elements from the horror and thriller genres, it also has all of the wonder and amazement that the best science fiction does.

Despite the reams of scientific jargon throughout the novel, the most interesting sci-fi elements of this novel are the scenes showing the strange world and thought patterns of the noocytes. The scenes of a continent being transformed into some kind of alien landscape, of people being copied and gaining access to lost memories from history, of inner space being as fascinating as outer space. Of reality itself being malleable and questionable. Although the novel takes a while to set all of this stuff up, it is well worth waiting for 🙂

It’s also a novel about the nature of change and innovation too, with the naively optimistic experiments at the beginning of the novel having a bit of an eerie resonance when read in this age of smartphones, social media mega-corporations, fake news and all of the other side-effects of the tech optimism of the 1990s. The focus on large tech companies near the beginning of the book (they are biotech companies, but are trendy in the way that Google, Facebook etc.. are) also helps to make the novel feel eerily prescient too.

It’s also a novel about individuality and community too. Of how a scientific discovery made by one person always involves “standing on the shoulders of giants”, how both individuality and community are important (perhaps a reference to democracy?), how we are all products of many years of human history etc… Seriously, it’s really fascinating.

This novel also has some fairly cool horror elements too, with lots of David Cronenburg-esque body horror involving people melting, merging and transforming in strange ways. Plus, there’s a bit of Richard Matheson-esque post-apocalyptic horror too 🙂

Interestingly though, whilst the scenes of people transforming are a brilliantly grotesque source of body horror during the early and middle parts of the book, this novel then somehow manages to find beauty in all of this (in a way that reminded me a little of Clive Barker’s horror and fantasy fiction).

Likewise, this novel also manages to be quite a compelling thriller too. Although it is a bit slow-paced and filled with formal scientific jargon at times, the quietly suspenseful early scenes where Vergil begins a mysterious transformation eventually morph into a worldwide geo-political storyline, which is also expertly counterpointed with suspenseful scenes of small-scale drama (eg: a young woman called Suzy who is alone in a post-apocalyptic version of Manhattan). Seriously, this story can be more of a thriller than you might expect – but don’t expect a modern-style ultra-fast paced thriller though.

In terms of the characters, this novel is better than it initially seems to be. Although the characters at first seem to be typical sci-fi stock characters (eg: the frustrated scientific genius, the beautiful lover, the charismatic businessman, the ordinary person, the doctor etc..), they gain a bit more depth and complexity as the novel progresses. This is also one of those interesting novels that doesn’t so much have one main character, but has a series of main characters that appear and disappear as the story progresses.

In terms of the writing, it is better than it initially appears to be. Although this novel’s third-person narration is peppered with bewildering scientific jargon and the occasional science lecture, the narrative parts of the story are a really interesting mixture of informal “matter of fact” descriptions and more formal/poetic/experimental narration. The mixture of these two things helps to keep the story comprehensible and compelling, whilst also allowing some parts of it to have a level of awe and wonder that you won’t find in films or TV shows.

In terms of length and pacing, this novel is interesting. At a gloriously efficient 262 pages in length, not a single page is wasted and the novel almost feels like three novels squashed into one 🙂 As for the pacing, although this novel would probably be considered “slow-paced” these days, it is really compelling and the story gradually builds in intensity throughout the novel too.

In terms of how this thirty-four year old novel has aged, it has aged surprisingly well. Yes, this story is very clearly set in the world of the early-mid 1980s (eg: scenes involving West Germany, the USSR, the World Trade Center etc.. and a few mildly dated descriptions), but the actual story itself feels eerily modern in many ways. Not only are many of the novel’s weirder scenes completely timeless, but the story also seems like an eerily prescient metaphor for modern social media etc…. when read today.

All in all, this is a brilliant book 🙂 Yes, it is a little bit slow-paced at times and all of the scientific jargon might be a little confusing but, if you persevere with it, then you will be rewarded with an absolutely brilliant and awe-inspiring story 🙂

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would just about get a five.