Awesome Art Can Lurk In Unlikely Places – A Ramble

Well, although this is an article about art, I’m going to have to start by talking about a TV show for a bit. This is mostly because, after discovering a random “funny moments” clip on Youtube, I ended up watching a DVD of a modern version of “Scooby Doo”. In addition to the humour, this was mostly because this cartoon series is a surprisingly good work of visual art. Here are a couple of examples to show you what I mean:

This is a screenshot from season one (2010-11) of “Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated” that includes dramatic high-contrast lighting, clever use of silhouettes and a brilliant purple/orange colour scheme.

This is another screenshot from season one, which includes an ominous red/blue colour scheme (with a reassuring hint of orange/yellow), some hints of high-contrast lighting and hints of 1960s-style watercolour artwork too.

This is a cartoon series that includes bold high-contrast lighting, a really interesting 1960s-inspired modern art style, well-chosen colour schemes, some really dramatic compositions and a whole host of other amazing artistic stuff that you wouldn’t traditionally expect to see in a Saturday morning cartoon. And, of course, this made me think about finding awesome artwork in unlikely places.

The most inspirational artwork isn’t usually found hidden away in art galleries. Instead, it is usually “hiding in plain sight” in all sorts of places that you wouldn’t expect.

For example, one of the major elements of my own art style (eg: high-contrast lighting) was mostly inspired by all of the old second-hand 1980s/90s horror novel covers I saw when I was a teenager and the cover art for all of the amazing old heavy metal albums I found back then.

Likewise, as I’ve mentioned at least a couple of times before, many of the best examples of dramatic composition, clever use of perspective, clever lighting etc… that I’ve found have been in the old “survival horror” computer/video games that I played during my youth:

This is a screenshot from the 2000 PC port of “Resident Evil 3” (1999). Notice how the “camera” not only lurks far away from the player’s character in order to create a feeling of both insignificance and of being watched, but also how the game designers use lighting to draw the player’s attention to where they are supposed to go next.

So, what was the point out all of this?

Well, it is that amazing art is all around us if we are willing to look. On any given day, you’ll probably see more pieces of art than you even consciously notice, and many of these are a lot more sophisticated than you might initially think – if you’re actually willing to look at them.

Not only can all of this amazing “hidden” artwork have an influence on our art styles without us even consciously noticing, but it is also the perfect riposte to people who think that art is a “pretentious” or “irrelevant” thing.

The fact is that the world looks the way that it does because of artists. Art is the background to all of our lives in ways that we may not even consciously notice. And, what this often means is that some of the coolest and most dramatic works of art can be quite literally “hiding in plain sight”.

————

Anyway, I hope that this was interesting 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.