Knowing When To Abandon A Comic- A Ramble

2016 Artwork When To Abandon A Comic

Well, I’d planned to start next year with a seven-page narrative sci-fi/comedy comic. However, by the time I’d drawn the line art for the cover and had begun to add paint, I realised that the project was doomed to failure. So, I abandoned it. However, I thought that I’d look at this failed idea to see if it can teach us anything about when to start a comic and when not to.

The comic was going to be titled “Future 2017” and it was going to be a “Blade Runner”/”The Terminator” parody comic featuring the characters from my long-running occasional “Damania” webcomic series (which can be found in the “2016” segment of this page). This is something that I’d been wanting to make for a while and the beginning of next year seemed to be the perfect time for it.

First of all, I planned the comic out. This is a good precaution to take to see if a comic is worth making. The art in your plans doesn’t have to be very sophisticated, but it should give you a general sense of what will happen in each panel and what the dialogue is. Most of all, it gives you a “trial run” of making the comic in a fraction of the time it would take you to actually make the comic.

 This is my plan for page two - it's been edited slightly for legibility, but although the art didn't have to look great, it was the crappy dialogue and crappy characterisation that was starting to worry me....

This is my plan for page two – it’s been edited slightly for legibility, but although the art didn’t have to look great, it was the crappy dialogue and crappy characterisation that was starting to worry me….

Unlike my Halloween comic, this plan didn’t flow very well. Sure, I could come up with some clever jokes (eg: a laser gun that rewards the user with coupons when fired a certain number of times) and some half-decent parodies of scenes from “Blade Runner” etc… But it all felt slightly forced and convoluted. Some of the jokes in other parts of the comic were also in slightly poor taste, which is often (but not always) a sign that you may be running out of inspiration or good ideas.

Worst of all, the characters started acting wildly out of character during the plans, purely for the sake of the jokes and references I was trying to shoehorn into the plan. I really didn’t get the sense of spontaneity that I got when I planned my Halloween comic. Look out for this sense of spontaneity – if your comic feels like it’s “almost writing itself”, this is usually a good sign. If it doesn’t, then be a bit more cautious.

Paying attention to how you feel when you are planning your comic is incredibly important. If planning your comic feels like a chore or a burden, then this is a sign that you should either change the idea or scrap it entirely.

In addition to this, I was also wrestling with the feeling that I “should” make this comic because I’ve wanted to for quite a while. This is something that is worth being aware of – just because an idea seems cool doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t approach it with caution.

Pay attention to your feelings – there’s a huge difference between “I have to make this comic RIGHT NOW!” and “I guess I should make this comic. It’s a cool idea, it probably shouldn’t go to waste, I guess“. After all, my idea for that abysmal “Let’s Play” comic that I made earlier this year seemed like a cool idea at first, but quickly went downhill. So, just because your idea is cool, it doesn’t always mean that your comic will be. Pay attention to how you feel about the idea.

Then there was the cover itself. Despite my reluctant feelings, I thought that I’d try to see if making the cover would revive my enthusiasm for this idea. Even from the beginning, I found myself putting the minimum amount of detail possible into the cover. Making it felt a bit like a chore, like something I had to get out of the way.

However, with my Halloween comic, I gleefully added as much detail as I could to the cover – not caring how long it took me to make it. Here’s are the covers of both for comparison:

 This cover is unfinished but, as you can see - the level of detail is fairly minimal when compared to the cover below.

This cover is unfinished but, as you can see – the level of detail is fairly minimal when compared to the cover below.

"Zombies Again! - Cover" By C. A. Brown

“Zombies Again! – Cover” By C. A. Brown

Once again, the message here is to pay attention to how you feel when you are making your comic. Luckily, I managed to do this a while after I started adding paint to the line art. However, I guess that all of this can only really be learnt through hard experience.

The warning signs for when a comic idea is doomed to failure (and best abandoned quickly) are probably different for each artist. You’ll probably have to make at least a few failed comics before you really know what to look out for. But, knowing when to start a comic and when not to is probably one of the most important skills that a comic-maker can learn.

——————

Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂

Advertisements

Four Things To Do If You’ve Missed The Heyday Of An Interesting Genre

2016 Artwork Genre Heyday article

Although this is an article that is intended to help you make interesting comics and/or write interesting fiction, I’m going to have to start by talking about one of my own interests. As usual, there’s a good reason for this that I hope becomes obvious.

A while before I started writing this aritlce, I found myself returning once again to one of the coolest genres of comics in existence. I am, of course, talking about old 1940s-50s American horror comics. Although I have at least one book of them, quite a few great examples of the genre are also posted on a historical archive site called “The Horrors Of It All“.

I love the melodramatic artwork, the hilariously dark humour, the “so bad that it’s good” storylines, the vintage fashions, the delightfully over-dramatic dialogue etc… Ever since I discovered this old genre of comics, it’s been one of my favourites.

In fact, they were the things that finally allowed me to work up the motivation to get back into making comics again in 2015, after a year or so when I hadn’t made any comics. Even though the first comic I made was a 1980s-style sci-fi/comedy/horror comic, it was at least slightly inspired by old horror comics.

These old horror comics are such a joy to read and whenever I’ve made anything even vaguely similar (like the Halloween comic that is currently being posted here every night), it has almost made itself.

And, yet, the heyday of this genre of comics has long-since passed. It’s always annoying when you find a really cool genre, only to discover that no-one else really makes or reads anything in it any more. So, what can you – as a writer and/or comic maker – do?

Here are a few suggestions:

1) Make it anyway: This is the obvious suggestion. If you really love an obscure and forgotten genre of comics and/or fiction, then make your own examples of it. If the genre really fascinates you, then coming up with story ideas probably won’t be that difficult. Likewise, you’ll probably be so enthusiastic that your story or comic will pretty much make itself.

However, unless you’ve already built up a large fanbase, it’s possible that your project might not have a very large audience. In other words, if you want to make something that is squarely within a long-dead genre, then don’t expect it to be the thing that suddenly brings this genre back to life and makes it popular again.

But, if you’re just making a fun project, then this doesn’t really matter. The real joy is in making something that you love and making something that the few remaining fans of this obscure old genre will also love.

2) Look for it’s modern equivalent: Genres never really die. They might change a lot over time, but they never really die. If a sub-genre was particularly popular, then there’s a good chance that it will have been absorbed into the “mainstream” version of this genre (eg: back in the 1970s-90s, a gory horror novel was a “splatterpunk” novel, now it’s just a “horror novel”).

In addition to this, some obscure genres have blended with other genres over time. For example, very few people write westerns these days, but – over the past decade or two – the western genre has had some influence on the sci-fi genre (eg: TV shows like “Firefly” etc…). The same is true for how the vampire genre has mostly gone from being a sub-genre of horror fiction to being a sub-genre of romance fiction these days.

So, if you want to make something that appeals to a slightly wider audience and/or which seems a bit more contemporary, then look for the modern equivalent of your favourite obscure genres. Once you’ve found it, then try to see if you can find a way to tell the story you want to tell within the “new” version of your forgotten genre.

For example, when I made my Halloween comic, I didn’t really think that much about old 1950s horror comics. If anything, it was probably more inspired by other parts of the horror genre (eg: zombie movies). And, yet, I was still making a horror comic. And having a lot of fun making it.

3) Let it influence other things: If you don’t feel confident about pouring lots of time and energy into making things that fit into mostly-forgotten genres, then this doesn’t mean that you should abandon them entirely. Instead, learn as much as you can about this genre and let it influence the things that you make in other genres.

In fact, if you’re interested enough in an old genre, then you don’t have have to try to do this. It’ll probably just happen naturally, possibly even without you even realising it.

4) Parody: One of the problems with really cool old genres is that they’re… well… old. If you try to make “serious” or “realistic” things within these genres, then they’re probably going to seem somewhat contrived and/or old-fashioned.

Either that, or you’re going to have to do a ridiculous amount of research in order to get everything right – and, if a genre has mostly been forgotten, then finding research materials might be something of a challenge.

So, relax and have some affectionate fun with the genre. In other words, make a parody of it. Not only will this probably be extremely fun to make, but comedy has a fairly wide appeal too. So, even people who aren’t fans of the old genre might want to read your story or comic, because it’s funny.

And, if they really like it, then it might even make them curious about the things that inspired it….

———————

Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂

Behind The Scenes! The Paintings That Didn’t Make It!

2016 Artwork Never seen before paintings May 2016

Well, there was originally going to be a “proper” article posted here today. In fact, there were going to be two. However, I ended up ditching the first article (about political cartoons) because I felt that it was “too cynical”… only to replace it with an even more cynical article about how videogames were better in the 1990s.

So, as a last minute replacement (since I’m not in a cynical mood at the moment). I thought that I’d show off a few of the paintings that – for whatever reason – didn’t make it into any of the daily art posts that I’ve got lined up for the next few months. Some of these are “new” paintings and some are unused alternative versions of existing paintings.

"Purple Sky Pyramids" By C. A. Brown [This digitally-edited painting was made in about twenty minutes as one of two emergency filler paintings I made so that I could start a comic on a particular day. After I'd made it, I realised that I only needed to make one filler painting, so this one got dropped.]

“Purple Sky Pyramids” By C. A. Brown [This digitally-edited painting was made in about twenty minutes as one of two emergency filler paintings I made so that I could start a comic on a particular day. After I’d made it, I realised that I only needed to make one filler painting, so this one got dropped.]

"Upon The Quad (Edited Version)" By C. A. Brown [When I was making a painting that will be posted here later this month, I wasn't sure about the colour scheme, so I made this surreal digitally-edited alternate version. Compared to this version, the more "realistic" version looked better - so I went with that version instead.]

“Upon The Quad (Edited Version)” By C. A. Brown [When I was making a painting that will be posted here later this month, I wasn’t sure about the colour scheme, so I made this surreal digitally-edited alternate version. Compared to this version, the more “realistic” version looked better – so I went with that version instead.]

"Vintage Bebop" By C. A. Brown [This was the original version of the 'Virtual Bebop' Painting I posted a couple of days ago. Since this painting looked a bit too minimalist, I ended up digitally adding a 1980s-style sci-fi background to the final version, which was called 'Virtual Bebop']

“Vintage Bebop” By C. A. Brown [This was the original version of the ‘Virtual Bebop’ Painting I posted a couple of days ago. Since this painting looked a bit too minimalist, I ended up digitally adding a 1980s-style sci-fi background to the final version, which was called ‘Virtual Bebop’]

"Resort Coast" By C. A. Brown [This was a digitally-edited landscape painting I'd originally made for an art post later this year. However, it looked kind of "boring" and, when I thought of a better idea for a painting for that day, I ended up replacing it].

“Resort Coast” By C. A. Brown [This was a digitally-edited landscape painting I’d originally made for an art post later this year. However, it looked kind of “boring” and, when I thought of a better idea for a painting for that day, I ended up replacing it].

"Alien Pyramids" By C. A. Brown [This was an extremely rushed digitally-edited painting that I made on Christmas Day 2015. In the end, I waited a while and replaced it with something that I put more time and effort into]

“Alien Pyramids” By C. A. Brown [This was an extremely rushed digitally-edited painting that I made on Christmas Day 2015. In the end, I waited a while and replaced it with something that I put more time and effort into]

"Where The Ice May Fall (80s Version)" By C. A. Brown [This is an alternative version of a digitally-edited painting that I posted here a couple of days ago. In the end, I went for the version with an all-blue colour scheme, but - at the time-  I was curious what it would look like with an orange/blue colour scheme]

“Where The Ice May Fall (80s Version)” By C. A. Brown [This is an alternative version of a digitally-edited painting that I posted here a couple of days ago. In the end, I went for the version with an all-blue colour scheme, but – at the time- I was curious what it would look like with an orange/blue colour scheme]

——–

Anyway, I hope that this was interesting 🙂 I’ll post a proper article here tomorrow 🙂

When To Abandon An Unfinished Piece Of Art (And When Not To)

2016 Artwork when should you abandon your art article sketch

If you’re an artist, then you’ve probably had times where you’re not sure whether or not to continue making a particular painting or drawing.

Sometimes, this is a pretty clear-cut decision (eg: if your preliminary sketch looks terrible) but other times, it can be a much more decision (eg: if part of your preliminary sketch looks cool, but you’re not sure what to do next.).

So, I thought that I’d share my thoughts about this subject, using an example from the cyberpunk art series that I’ve been talking about quite a bit recently.

Anyway, the night before I wrote this article, I’d started sketching randomly and I’d sketched a slightly futuristic film noir-style character leaning against a chair and holding a traditional-style document file.

This is a recreation of my original unfinished sketch, made by digitally editing the line art for the finished painting (spoiler alert).

This is a recreation of my original unfinished sketch, made by digitally editing the line art for the finished painting (spoiler alert).

As this recreation shows, it had the potential to turn into an interesting painting, but I wasn’t sure what to do next. So, I asked myself a few questions…

Should I make the background look like an old film noir detective’s office? If I were to do this, then it would explain why the character was holding a traditional document folder (in the distant future). However, if I was to use this idea, then I’d got the composition of my sketch totally wrong (since the character should have been closer to the centre of the picture).

Should I add another character? If so, where do I add them? I mean, I hadn’t planned to add another character.

Should I set this picture indoors or outdoors? It’d have to be indoors because of the objects near the character, but I wanted the picture to have a sense of scale.

In the end, I wasn’t sure what to do and – rather than sitting around and not doing anything – I started drawing out the guidelines for another picture (eg: an 18×18 cm square with 1.5 cm “letterboxing” lines at the top and bottom).

Since I was very slightly pressed for time, I realised that I didn’t want to have to come up with a totally new idea for a painting again. So, I returned to my unfinished painting and tried to salvage it.

I took all of the questions that I’d asked myself and tried to find a compromise between each possible “yes” or “no” answer. I decided to set the picture in a library/archive – since it’d explain why the character was holding a traditional document folder in the distant future.

A traditional library would also have the ambience of an old office, but would also have the large expansive scale of an outdoor location (especially after I added the large windows in the background).

I also added another character too, but I kind of hid him behind a pillar slightly (which also gave me the chance to practice drawing people from unusual angles) etc… This is the final result:

"Archive Files" By C. A. Brown

“Archive Files” By C. A. Brown

Because I’d only made a relatively small part of this picture, I had a lot of room to work with when it came to working out how to salvage the rest of the picture. This can be a much more tricky decision to make when you’ve already sketched out large parts of your picture. But, if you’ve done this, then sometimes all it can take is a few small changes to salvage a picture.

In a way, there are no real “rules” when it comes to deciding whether to salvage or abandon an unfinished picture. It depends a lot on how much of a perfectionist you are and it depends on how good or bad your unfinished sketch is.

For example, because I try to make a piece of art every day – I’ve learnt not to be too much of a perfectionist. An unfinished picture has to look seriously terrible before I’ll give up on it.

However, if I’m totally and utterly “stuck” when it comes to deciding what to do next with a picture, then I’ll often move on to another one for purely practical reasons (since I actually want to have a finished painting by the end of the day).

Having a regular art schedule means that I’ll only decide to abandon a picture when it’s strictly necessary. However, this also means that I might end up with a rather crappy picture every now and then. Still, different things work for different people and you might not thrive by working to a regular schedule.

I guess what I’m trying to say here is that there’s a middle ground when it comes to deciding whether or not to abandon your art. If you abandon every picture when there’s even a slight chance that it might not turn out well, you’ll never learn how to cover up mistakes, think quite as creatively etc… However, if you never abandon a painting then you might end up getting completely “stuck” when you might be better off starting a new painting.

I don’t know, it’s a complicated subject.

———————–

Anyway, I hope that this was interesting 🙂

Returning To The Horror Genre – A Ramble

Yay! Obscure movie reference! Of course, the sad thing is that the last time I watched this movie was over a DECADE ago! (If you can't guess which film it is, I'll mention it at the end of this article).

Yay! Obscure movie reference! Of course, the sad thing is that the last time I watched this movie was over a DECADE ago! (If you can’t guess which film it is, I’ll mention it at the end of this article).

Although this is a rambling article about reintroducing yourself to genres of fiction that you’ve abandoned for one reason or another, I’m going to have to start by talking about TV shows, movies and myself for quite a while.

There’s (sort of) a good reason for this which I hope will become apparent to you later. But, if you don’t want to read this, then just skip to the last few paragraphs (where I boldly state the obvious).

Anyway, a while back I discovered an American TV show called “Supernatural“. Since the DVD boxsets of the first two seasons were going cheap second-hand and I’d read that it was the closest modern equivalent to “The X-Files”, I had to check it out.

I’d expected it to be a paranormal mystery series (with some horror elements) but what I didn’t expect was that it was an actual honest-to-god horror series.

Seriously, even the pilot episode is basically a forty-minute long Hollywood-quality horror movie. This caught me by surprise because it made me wonder “when was the last time I actually watched a proper horror movie?

It took me a while to work out the answer, but it’s been about a year and a half. Likewise, it’s probably been about a year and a half since I read a vaguely decent horror novel (a book called “Dead Space: Martyr” By B. K.Evenson, if anyone is interested).

In that moment, I fully realised just how much I’d abandoned the horror genre in recent years.

You see, back when I was a teenager, horror was one of my favourite genres. I used to eagerly read old second-hand splatterpunk novels from the 70s, 80s and 90s. I used to scour charity shops for anything by Shaun Hutson, James Herbert or Clive Barker. Or, failing that, I’d go for any book with a suitably gruesome or gloomy picture on the cover.

I used to eagerly record notorious horror movies on VHS when they were shown on TV (since I looked too young to lie about my age convincingly enough to buy most of them on video) and, on a holiday to France when I was about fourteen or fifteen, I stocked up on American zombie movies on DVD after learning that the French have a commendably laid-back attitude to film censorship.

Even in my late teens and early twenties, I made a point of seeing almost all of the “Saw” movies at the cinema. In fact, the only “Saw” movie I haven’t seen at the cinema was the very first one.

When I was younger, horror was cool, horror was rebellious, horror was dramatic and horror was cathartic. And, yet, now that I’m in my mid-late twenties – I’ve pretty much abandoned my beloved horror genre.

Sure, I still pay lip service to liking the horror genre on an occasional basis – but I seem to have moved away from enjoying proper frightening horror stories, games and movies.

Maybe this is just a sign that my tastes are changing, or maybe it’s an unconscionable dereliction of one the most crucially formative genres of my creative imagination? After all, one of the reasons I got interested in writing fiction when I was a teenager was because I wanted to write horror stories like Shaun Hutson did.

Anyway, this made me think about how to get back into genres that you’ve since abandoned. Sometimes this isn’t a particularly difficult thing to do, since you can just pick up where you left off. But, if you’ve been away for a while, it can be difficult to re-create the sense of enthusiasm you once had.

So, I guess that the best way to get back into a genre that you’ve abandoned is to do it gradually. To start off with more mainstream and/or less intense examples of the genre (eg: I might currently find “Supernatural” to be a genuinely scary TV show, but my teenage self would have probably just laughed at it and/or wondered why there wasn’t more blood and guts) and to gradually work your way back up to the things that you used to enjoy.

To give you another example of what I mean – I used to write a lot of horror fiction when I was younger and, even after I lost interest in writing fiction, I still enjoyed the idea of making horror comics.

But, since I’ve been away from the horror genre for such a long time, my more recent horror comics tend to be more comedic than frightening. But at least they’re loosely-related to the horror genre.

Either that, or you could just re-visit the books/movies/ games etc.. that you used to like and go on from there. I guess that the important thing is just to return to the genre.

(And, if anyone is still wondering about the movie reference earlier – it’s based on the alternate ending to “Army Of Darkness”. Interestingly, when I bought this film on an ex-rental VHS when I was 14, it contained this ending instead of the “proper” ending).

——-

Anyway, I hope that this was interesting 🙂

Should You Make Stuff In “Abandoned” Genres?

2015 Artwork Dead Genres Article Sketch

A few months ago, I was looking through the “stats” page for this site, when I suddenly noticed one of the Google queries that had led someone to this site. The question went something along the lines of “are splatterpunk novels still being written ?

This was an interesting question since splatterpunk fiction is one of my favourite types of horror fiction and I absolutely loved reading old second-hand splatterpunk novels from the 80s and 90s when I was a teenager. But, apart from a couple of old-school splatterpunk authors who still sometimes work in the genre (like Shaun Hutson), there aren’t really a huge number of splatterpunk writers out there these days.

But, that’s not to say that splatterpunk is dead – far from it. It’s just that splatterpunk fiction has influenced the horror genre as a whole – and made it ok for horror stories to be as gruesome as the author wants them to be.

As such, “splatterpunk” novels aren’t being written that often today because, in a strange way, the genre has served it’s purpose. If your horror story features a few gruesome scenes, then most people will just think of it as “ordinary” horror fiction, rather than “splatterpunk fiction”. This probably wouldn’t have been the case thirty or forty years ago.

The same sort of thing is also kind of true for the cyberpunk genre too – after all, it was a daring vision of the future in the 1980s. But, these days, we all use the internet. In fact, unless you’re reading a printout of this article, then you’re using it right now. You’re using something that was a key part of a “futuristic” type of science fiction back in the 1980s. Just let that sink in for a moment.

But, the cyberpunk genre has – in it’s own way – had a huge influence on the science fiction genre as a whole. There are more than a few “ordinary” modern science fiction novels that are set in dystopic versions of the future, where the world is ruled by large corporations. This (mostly) came from the cyberpunk genre.

Not to mention that many ‘near future’ science fiction films, comics and computer games made since the early-mid 1980s are at least slightly visually influenced by old cyberpunk movies like “Blade Runner” and “Akira”.

So, it isn’t that obscure old genres such as these have been “abandoned”, it’s just that they’ve kind of been absorbed back into the genre that they came from. They’ve become part of the mainstream idea of what that particular genre looks like. Although they may have started out as a way to rebel against the traditions of a particular genre, they’ve ended up becoming one of those traditions.

Of course, the important question here is whether you should work in one of these old genres or not. The answer to this question is pretty simple – if you like the genre, then work in it. If you don’t like the genre, then don’t work in it.

But, even if you decide not to work in one of these old genres, then there’s a good chance that at least part of them will end up in your work anyway.

For example, even if you’ve never read a splatterpunk novel before, then there’s a good chance that some splatterpunk stuff might creep into your horror novel or comic without your knowledge – for the simple reason that it’s an “ordinary” part of the horror genre these days. The modern horror stories that might have inspired you to write one of your own have probably been at least slightly inspired (directly or indirectly) by old splatterpunk novels.

So, yes, you might already be writing something in an obscure old genre without even really knowing that you’re doing it.

———

Anyway, I hope that this was interesting 🙂

Four Tips For Restarting An Abandoned Creative Project

2014 Artwork Restarting Old Projects Sketch

Ok, most of the time that we end up abandoning art, comic and/or writing projects, there’s usually a good reason for it. If that reason is that you didn’t have time to continue it, then getting back into it when you’ve got time hopefully shouldn’t be that difficult if it’s a project that you enjoy working on.

But if you either ran out of inspiration or just ended up feeling too creatively exhausted to keep working on the project, then getting back into it can be a lot more difficult. And although I don’t personally plan on restarting any projects at the time of writing this article, I thought that I’d offer a few tips that might come in handy.

1) Know yourself: Personally, I’ve only ever been able to restart a couple of my abandoned creative projects – the most notable example being a comic I made in 2013 called “Somnium“. I abandoned it for a day or two, before I started to miss it and eventually returned to make a few more chapters of it.

And, most of the time, when I restart an abandoned project, my second attempt at it doesn’t last as long as my first does. Likewise, I’ve always found open-ended episodic projects slightly easier to restart than projects that just tell one continuous story.

Why am I mentioning this? Well, one of the best ways to get a good idea of whether you’ll be able to restart one of your abandoned projects is to know yourself as well as possible.

If you know what kinds of projects you work best on, then you can focus on restarting these types of projects rather than throwing yourself into resurrecting projects that have little chance of succeeding.

Likewise, knowing how long you can keep working on resurrected projects can be very useful too.

Yes, you’ll only gain this knowledge through experience and failure but if, for example, you know that your restarted projects don’t last for very long, then you can focus on concluding them in a satisfying way rather than just continuing as normal and leaving them unfinished again a few days/weeks/months later.

2) Get back into the mood: One of the problems I’ve sometimes found with old projects (which often puts me off of restarting them) is that they feel like they “belong” to the particular part of my past when I started work on them.

Because my interests, mood, outlook, imagination and life have probably moved on to slightly different things since then – it can be near-impossible to get into the same creative mindset again if I leave it too long before restarting a project.

If you have the same problem that I do, then it might be useful to try to listen to the music you were listening to when you originally started your project, to re-watch the movies and/or TV shows you were watching at the time etc…

Basically, if you try to surround yourself with things that you associate with that particular time, then there’s a chance that you might get back into the right mindset to resume work on your abandoned project.

3) Low expectations: If you’re returning to an abandoned project, then it’s probably best to do it with slightly lower expectations than you might have if you were starting a totally new project.

This isn’t to say that you should condemn yourself to failure before you even begin, but you should probably be especially aware of why you originally abandoned the project and try to make sure that it doesn’t happen again.

Not only that, if you restart a project with low expectations then it’ll be less of a disappointment if you end up abandoning it again. Conversely, it will also be a lot more amazing if you succeed on your second try. Either way, you win.

4) Make some changes: Sometimes projects are abandoned for very good practical reasons – either you’ve found them impossible to work on or something just isn’t quite right about the project.

Perhaps you used first-person narration when you should have used third-person narration? Perhaps a central element of the plot gets in the way of other parts of the story? Perhaps the colour scheme in your comic clashes quite a bit? etc….. All of these things can ruin a project and make people abandon it after a while.

So, when you’re returning to an abandoned project, don’t be afraid to take a careful look at it and change anything that doesn’t work. Not only will this improve your project, but it’ll also give you something of an emotional boost – since it’ll almost feel like you’re working on a new project again.

——–

Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂