Review: “Dex: Enhanced Version” (Computer Game)

Well, since I’m still reading the next book I plan to review (“Tower Hill” by Sarah Pinborough), I thought that I’d review a computer game that I’ve wanted to play for at least a couple of years. I am, of course, talking about an indie cyberpunk 2D platformer/role-playing game from 2015 called “Dex”.

I first heard about “Dex” in either 2016 or 2017 and I really wanted to play this cool “Ghost In The Shell”, “Deus Ex“, “Blade Runner” etc… inspired game back then. But, then I saw the system requirements. Although I had an old computer that could play modern 2D “point and click” cyberpunk games like “Technobabylon” and “Gemini Rue“, this 2D platformer required a dual-core processor. So, it got added to the long list of “games I wish I could play, but can’t thanks to bloated modern system requirements“.

But, shortly after getting a vaguely modern refurbished computer a few weeks before preparing this review, I decided to download the free demo of “Dex” (yes, unlike many modern games, it actually has a demo 🙂 Albeit one that was released two years after the game) to test it out.

And, when the game went on sale on GOG last winter (I prepare these reviews very far in advance), the decision whether to buy a copy was an absolute no-brainer. Interestingly, the version available on GOG at the time of writing is the “Enhanced Version” which apparently includes some content (eg: various cybernetic suits etc..) that was previously released as DLC, in addition to the usual GOG extras like the game’s soundtrack, wallpapers etc….

So, let’s take a look at “Dex: Enhanced Version”. Needless to say, this review may contain some PLOT SPOILERS.

Set in a neon-drenched cyberpunk mega-city called Harbor Prime, you play as a mysterious blue-haired woman called Dex who wakes up after having a strange dream. Seconds later, you get a call from a mysterious internet person called Raycast telling you that people are coming to get you and you need to run. After dashing across the rooftops and making your way through a gang hideout in the sewers, you emerge in a part of the city called Fixer’s Hope.

Raycast tells Dex to head to a local bar that is popular with hackers. But, after talking to the owner for a while, it is raided by corporate henchmen and Dex barely manages to escape to the hideout of a local hacker called Tony. To Tony’s surprise, it quickly becomes obvious that Dex can access cyberspace without having to jack into a computer. Not only that, Raycast delivers a message saying that Dex is humanity’s only hope of destroying a malicious A.I. called GSV-2 controlled by an ominous group called The Complex who want to take over the world….

Powerful artificial intelligences? A character with “Deck” in his name? A hacker cave? Yes, this is cyberpunk 🙂

One of the first things that I will say about this game is that it is basically a modern low-budget 2D version of the kind of cool immersive sim/action RPG games like “Deus Ex” and “Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines” that were popular in the early-mid 2000s. In other words, this game has atmosphere and depth 🙂 Plus, although this game wears it’s many influences on it’s sleeve, it still manages to be something refreshingly new and interesting at the same time too 🙂 Although it probably isn’t a perfect game, it is certainly a really cool one 🙂

I should probably start by talking about the gameplay. Although the game does feature some limited 2D platforming and a combat system, these aren’t the most compelling parts of the game. No, this is a game where you’ll probably be more interested in talking to people, building your stats, looking for side-quests, drinking in the atmosphere, choosing augmentations, making decisions, solving puzzles, hacking computers, managing your inventory and exploring the city for loot.

So, yes, this is more of a RPG than a traditonal 2D platformer, but what a RPG it is. It has the same immersive, detailed worldbuilding that you’d expect to find in games like “Shadowrun: Dragonfall“, “Deus Ex”, “VTM: Bloodlines” etc… and it is an absolute joy to experience. There are lots of interesting side-characters, multiple ways to solve problems, optional side-quests, hidden items, amusing item descriptions and of course the kind of neon-drenched, run-down atmosphere that you’d expect from a cyberpunk game 🙂

Yes, not every location looks like this (and there’s lots of post-apocalyptic rubble and/or utilitarian concrete in other areas), but this game certainly looks very cyberpunk 🙂

Seriously, I love the general style and atmosphere of this game 🙂 Imagine everything cool in the cyberpunk genre, and you’ll find some hint of it here 🙂 It has “Deus Ex”-inspired gameplay, a lot of thematic and visual inspiration from both “Ghost In The Shell” and “Blade Runner”, it sometimes has the kind of vaguely anarchist atmosphere of something like “Shadowrun: Dragonfall”, there is at least one reference to the ICE from “Neuromancer” etc… I could go on for a while but, if you are a fan of cyberpunk, then this game is for you 🙂 Yet. as mentioned earlier, it still manages to be it’s own unique thing in addition to all of these cool influences.

The game’s roleplaying elements are really cool too 🙂 This is the kind of game where you’ll probably want to do as many of the optional side-quests (which involve things like taking down gangs, dealing with a stalker, rescuing a man from a brothel, finding antiques, investigating a closed restaurant etc..) as possible, and not just because you’ll get cash or experience from them. They’re interesting. Although the game’s RPG elements (eg: character stats, dialogue trees, damage scores appearing in combat etc..) are nothing new, they really help to give the game the kind of immersive depth that you’d expect to see in something like a “point and click” game 🙂

Seriously, it’s almost like a point-and-click game, but with faster-paced and more varied gameplay 🙂

Seriously, I love the writing and art style in this game. The dialogue and voice-acting feels like a reasonably “natural” part of the game’s world, and all of the in-game text has the kind of personality and subtle humour that you’d expect from a game of this type 🙂 Whilst the game’s main story isn’t anything too surprising, it is still delivered in a very compelling way and there’s enough background details, optional stuff etc.. to make the game’s world feel real.

Likewise, this game looks really cool too 🙂 Not only does it use a timeless 2D art style, but there are some cool-looking locations (albeit with some fairly drab concrete ones too) and the player character animations are really cool too (seriously, it’s difficult not to feel a little bit like a Blade Runner whilst drawing your weapon or running around the city etc..). The animation for the background characters tends to be a little bit more limited but, overall, this game looks really cool 🙂

Not to mention that some of the backgrounds look really cool too.

Even so, expect a lot of understated, utilitarian and/or concrete locations too.

The game’s puzzles are reasonably decent too. I’m terrible at puzzle games and I only had to use a walkthrough twice whilst playing and, on one of those occasions, I’d almost solved the puzzle in question but made one stupid mistake (eg: forgetting that the alphabet only has 26 letters). In other words, the puzzles are reasonably forgiving, logical and relatively infrequent too 🙂 They add an extra layer of variety to the game without really getting in the way of the gameplay too much.

Plus, the game will actually reward exploration too since you can usually find puzzle hints if you look for them. However, you might need to increase the screen resolution in order to read them if you’re playing on a lower resolution.

Likewise, I love how this game encourages you to explore. Although the city isn’t that large (there are maybe 10-15 different parts of the city to explore), there are hidden items/areas to find and everywhere looks really cool too. Not only that, there is also a fast-travel system that helps to remove a lot of the “back and forth” drudgery that comes from some parts of the game. And, yes, this game can sometimes involve a bit of this, so the fast-travel (and the fact that this game has a fairly traditional “save almost anywhere” saving system) really helps a lot 🙂

Seriously, this is so useful 🙂 Without it, the game would get a bit tedious at times.

Still, I should probably talk about the game’s action and platforming elements. They are…functional, I guess.

As you would expect from a RPG, you’ll be fairly weak in both ranged and melee combat until you upgrade your stats and/or find enough in-game money (no micro-transactions here 🙂 ) to buy decent weapons and, more importantly, enough ammo for them. Although the combat is made a bit more forgiving via the inclusion of things like stealth takedowns, the fact that you can run away from most enemies and, if you complete one side quest, get a thermo-optic camouflage stealth suit (in the “Enhanced Version” of the game) too, it still feels like one of the weaker parts of the game.

If you want an action game, then play something else. The combat here does it’s job, but it isn’t the best or most interesting part of the game.

Then again, given the inclusion of a basic stealth system and the ways that combat can be avoided (eg: hacking cameras, running etc..), this isn’t too much of an issue. Even so, it’s more like a 2D version of the combat in the original “Deus Ex” (eg: ranged and melee combat feel a little weak and/or inaccurate) and/or the combat in the original “Resident Evil” (eg: you have to draw your gun before firing. However, unlike “Resident Evil” you can move with a drawn weapon) than the thrillingly streamlined combat in something like a traditional FPS game.

Interestingly, the best action-based parts of the game are probably the computer hacking mini-games. They are these surprisingly challenging bullet hell style mini-games that are played from a top-down perspective and they are reasonably fun. Unlike the more abstract-feeling weapon combat segments, the hacking sections actually feel a little bit more like a thrilling, streamlined action game.

Yes, the combat is actually more fun in these mini-games than in the actual main game.

Likewise, the platforming works reasonably well – with Dex having the ability to grab onto ledges and to buy an augmentation that allows her to jump higher. Even so, it isn’t really a major part of the gameplay in the way that it would be in a traditional 2D platformer. In other words, the platforming is a bit more “realistic” and, although there are a couple of places where you have to dodge environmental hazards or leap over bottomless pits, these are very much the exception rather than the rule.

Yes, this moment of traditional old-school toxic-waste dodging is very much the exception rather than the rule with this game’s platforming elements.

As for the game’s length, this depends a lot on you. If you do all of the side-quests etc… then you can get a few decent 2-4 hour gaming sessions out of this game. But, if you ignore as much of the interesting optional stuff as possible, then I’d imagine that the game could theoretically be completed in a few hours at most. Still, given that the optional quests allow you to gain more experience, skills, resources etc… that you’ll need later in the game, maybe not.

Another interesting thing about this game’s length is that it is actually longer than it initially appears to be – in short, there is a point where it seems like the game has finished (eg: a “boss battle”-like segment, followed by a dramatic cutscene) only for there to be at least a couple of hours of gameplay after this. Given how compelling I found this game to be and how dramatic these extra couple of hours of gameplay are, this felt a lot like an encore at a concert and it was really cool to have more of it than I’d expected.

In terms of sound design and music, ths game is fairly decent. Although the music isn’t that memorable, it still fits in well with the game and the sound effects also do their job well enough too.

All in all, whilst this isn’t a perfect game, it is a really cool one 🙂 If you love the immersive depth of games like “Deus Ex” and “VTM: Bloodlines” and/or you’re a fan of the cyberpunk genre, then you’ll have a lot of fun with this game. Yes, the combat and platforming aren’t the game’s strongest points, but this is still a really compelling, atmospheric and just generally interesting game 🙂

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get four and a half.

Review: “Remothered: Tormented Fathers” (Computer Game)


Well, after a marathon gaming session, I finally completed a modern survival horror game that I’d been playing for several weeks before I prepared this review. I am, of course, talking about an “AA” indie game called “Remothered: Tormented Fathers” (2018) which I’ve been meaning to review for a while.

This was the first new game I bought for my modern refurbished computer (after seeing that, late last year, it was on sale on GOG) and, to my delight, it would actually just about run on my computer’s integrated IntelHD 2500 graphics.

However, in order to get an even vaguely playable framerate, I had to turn most of the graphics settings down to the absolute minimum … and then both reduce the FOV and lower the resolution scaling to 40%. So, the screenshots in this review won’t reflect how the game will look on a computer with an actual graphics card.

Interestingly though, this game contains pre-rendered cutscenes (which show what the game looks like on high graphics) – so, if you want an old-school 1990s/early 2000s-style experience, then the difference between cutscenes and gameplay just adds to the charm when playing on ultra-low graphics.

Anyway, let’s take a look at “Remothered: Tormented Fathers”. Needless to say, this review will contain some PLOT SPOILERS.

The game begins with a journalist talking to a mysterious old woman called Madame Svenska. The story then flashes back to 1970s Italy. Dr. Rosemary Reed has driven to the rural mansion of an old man called Richard Felton in order to ask about his missing daughter Celeste. Needless to say, the meeting doesn’t go well and Dr. Reed is thrown out of the mansion by Felton’s nurse, Gloria.

Hiding nearby, Dr.Reed waits for Gloria to leave for the night, before finding a hidden key and sneaking back into the mansion to find Richard’s reclusive wife, Arianna. However, when she gets to Arianna’s bedroom, she is horrified to find a decaying corpse on the bed. Not only that, Richard Felton is nearby – wearing nothing but an apron, carrying a sharp sickle and muttering ominously. Even worse, the front door to the mansion has been blocked by an iron grille. Needless to say, Dr.Reed needs to find a way out of the mansion before it is too late….

One of the first things that I will say about this game is that it is the scariest computer game I’ve ever played. Seriously, even “Silent Hill 3” seems only moderately creepy in comparison to the literal adrenaline-rushing, heart-pounding and, on one occasion, insomnia-inducing terror that I felt literally every time I played this game. But, this isn’t a linear jump scare game designed for “Let’s Play” Youtube videos, this is a modern old-school survival horror game of the type that hasn’t been made for ages 🙂 Yes, it isn’t perfect, but it’s still one hell of a game 🙂

YES! It’s a survival horror game from 2018 🙂

However, unlike many classic survival horror games (except possibly the “Clock Tower” games, which I haven’t played), the emphasis here is not on combat but on sneaking past and/or hiding from powerful killers who, at most, can only be briefly stunned, temporarily distracted or, if you’re good enough at running away, left far enough behind you to give you a brief chance to hide.

Although I normally loathe and despise stealth games, the fact that this is a modern old-school survival horror game more than makes up for this 🙂 Even if, like me, you might spend literally weeks of gaming sessions cowering in one of the cupboards near the beginning of the game until you learn how the killers’ AI works and how to sneak around properly, this game is still really compelling. If you dare to play it.

Yes, it’s a stealth game. But, the utterly terrifying horror elements more than make up for this 🙂

Still, this game is a really cool homage to so many classic games. Although the main inspirations were apparently “Clock Tower” and various horror movies, fans of classic survival horror will see many familiar inspirations. Whether it is the “Silent Hill 3”-style way the soundtrack will become more intense when danger is nearby, the vaguely “Alone In The Dark” style main character and location design or the “Resident Evil 2”-style way that health levels are shown via injuries to the main character etc… Yet, despite all of these inspirations, the game is still very much it’s own thing too.

Plus, as I mentioned before, this is an extremely scary horror game! Not only does this game include lots of suspense, atmosphere, psychological horror, some moments of gory horror and even a few jump scares, but the whole game is designed to impart a terrifying feeling of vulnerability too. Whether it is the small number of save points, the frantic quick-time events, the slightly unpredictable enemy movement paths, the weak single-use weapons, the restricted view from hiding places etc… this is pretty much abject terror in game form.

Seriously, don’t play this at night. You probably won’t be able to get any sleep afterwards…

Unlike modern linear Youtube-focused horror games, this is very much a game of skill too 🙂 Not only will you gradually get accustomed to listening out for the killers, but doing things like memorising hiding places and learning how to use single-use defence weapons and throwable distraction items are pretty much essential too. Likewise, you’d better get to know the layout of the mansion like the back of your hand, since it’ll come in handy when you’re fleeing in terror. Though, of course, running makes noise. Noise attracts attention. This is a bad thing.

Ok, this is from a cutscene. When the killers appear in-game, there’s usually no time to take screenshots. Running and hiding is more important.

When it is at it’s best, this game is a heart-poundingly thrilling game of cat and mouse. At it’s worst, it can be a little bit of a waiting simulator though – especially if, like me, you find yourself too scared to emerge from a hiding place.

Yes, you’ll become quite familiar with these. Eventually, you might even work up the courage to leave them. Until then, expect lots of scary boredom.

Still, although the stealth in this game is fairly well-handled, it is brutally unforgiving at times. The killers often linger near hiding places for long periods of time and there are some fixed distraction items placed in positions where pretty much the only way to leave the area after you’ve activated them is also the only path that the killer will take to find them. Yes, there are time-delayed distraction items too – but these can’t be remotely activated from other parts of the house (so they’re less useful than you might think. You just kind of place them and then wait).

Although there were moments when I found myself wishing for an “easy mode” or some cheat codes, I can respect the decision not to include difficulty settings or cheats in this game. Yes the game’s challenging stealth system takes a while to learn and get used to – but the challenging difficulty also helps to add extra horror, adrenaline and suspense to the game too.

Yes, this isn’t your usual “walking simulator with jump scares” modern indie horror game. You actually need skill to beat this game.

Of course, like in all classic survival horror games, this one also includes item puzzles too. Although these are relatively easy in principle, they will often send you back and forth across the mansion (which, in case you’ve forgotten, is aslo populated by vicious killers). So, the puzzles are more challenging than they may initially seem.

Yes, the puzzles may not be that difficult. But, you have to solve them whilst also hiding from scary people too.

In fact, I ended up using a walkthrough for most of the puzzles so that I could focus more attention on hiding, sneaking etc.. However, I actually had to restart this game at one point because I found two items (the film and the projector battery) before reading the piece of paper that tells you to collect them and formally gives you the objective. This caused the game to get stuck in an unwinnable state. So, don’t sequence break if you’re using a walkthrough.

In terms of the story and characters, they’re both brilliant and terrible. Although the voice-acting can be a little bit corny during some of the cutscenes, the killers’ in-game dialogue often walks a brilliantly fine line between disturbing and hilarious (with, for example, Mr.Felton sounding like a cantankerous old man, one of the other villains reciting Bible verses in a croaky voice, one sounding like an evil version of Meg from “Family Guy” and another sounding like a “wicked witch” character from a fairytale).

Plus, unlike the military protagonists and/or well-armed civilians of many classic survival horror games, Dr.Reed actually comes across as a realistic character who is also genuinely afraid of the game’s many scary things.

Another interesting thing that I’ve noticed is that, unlike most classic-style survival horror games, the main character never carries a gun. This makes the game about ten times scarier.

Plus, whenever you hide, you’ll hear Dr.Reed mutter exclamations of dread and breathe heavily, which really adds to the suspense.

Not only that, the game’s story is better than it initially seems to be 🙂 Even though the plot is a little convoluted at times, even though the game’s ending is a clear set up for a sequel (although many parts of the game’s story are resolved) and even though some story elements are fairly standard “evil experiments” stuff, the game knows when to tell you stuff and when to leave stuff to your imagination. Plus, the characterisation is reasonably good too.

Not only are all of the characters’ backstories both explained enough to make sense and left mysterious enough to be intriguing, but you’ll probably also eventually end up feeling sympathetic for the house’s evil residents too.

Plus, there are also loads of subtle character details that will only make sense later in the game. To give you an example, Felton will occasionally sing a nursery rhyme in the early parts of the game. When you first hear this, you’ll just assume that it’s there because it is creepy. When you learn more backstory, this detail makes a bit more sense (even if it isn’t explicitly spelled out).

Seriously, I cannot praise the character design in this game highly enough. There are so many small details that only make sense later in the game.

In terms of music and sound effects, this game absolutely excels 🙂 A lot of what makes this game so nerve-frayingly terrifying is the ominous ambient music and all of the sound effects that you’ll constantly be listening out for. Seriously, expect to jump whenever you hear footsteps or opening doors for a while after each gaming session. However, one small problem with the sound design is that sometimes the killers can sound closer than they actually are (eg: they may technically be near you, but the game can’t tell that there’s a wall in the way etc..) – then again, this might have been an intentional choice to make the game even scarier.

In terms of level design and visual design, this game is really good. Even at the kind of low graphics settings which reduce the textures to Playstation One levels of blurriness, the mansion is still incredibly atmospheric, not to mention that the mansion also contains a really good mixture of both scary open areas and scary claustrophobic areas too. It’s also large enough to feel daunting, whilst being small enough that it won’t take you too long to learn where everything is. Plus, it goes without saying, but it’s always awesome to see old-school non-linear level design in a modern game too 🙂

Plus, creeping around evil mansions somehow never gets old either 🙂

As for length, this is probably a short to medium-length game. If you’re an expert at stealth games, have nerves of steel and are using a walkthrough, then you’ll probably be able to complete it in a few hours. But, if you are of even a vaguely nervous disposition or have more practice at action-packed games than stealth games, you can get weeks of terrifying gaming sessions out of this game.

All in all, whilst this isn’t a perfect game, it is still a really awesome one 🙂 It’s a real survival horror game from 2018 🙂 If you want a modern horror game that will leave you a nervous wreck after every session, if you miss the “Silent Hill” and/or “Clock Tower” games and/or if you want something a bit more imaginative and skill-based than linear jump-scare based Youtube-focused horror games, then play this one. Yes, it requires practice and it can get stuck in an unwinnable state if you don’t do some things in the correct order, but it’s still a really brilliant – and very, very scary- horror game 🙂

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get at least four and a half.

Review: “Shadow Warrior (2013 Remake)” (Computer Game)

Well, since I’m still reading the next book that I plan to review (“The Sinner” By Tess Gerritsen), I thought that I’d review a computer game I’ve been waiting quite a few years to play. I am, of course talking about the 2013 remake of the classic 1997 first-person shooter game “Shadow Warriror” 🙂

When I first heard about this remake back in 2013, I was really amazed. After all, growing up in the 1990s/early-mid 2000s and being a fan of FPS games, the original 1997 “Shadow Warrior” game evokes a lot of nostalgia for me (even if, by modern standards, some elements of that game haven’t aged well). However, back in 2013, I had a very old and low-end computer and I was uncertain about whether it could run the modern remake of “Shadow Warrior”.

Of course, about three or four weeks before I prepared this review, I got a modern refurbished computer and, since “Shadow Warrior (2013)” was on special offer on GOG at the time, I had to get a copy. To my delight, it still ran fairly well and also looked good on medium to low graphics settings with my computer’s integrated Intel HD 2500 graphics.

However, I had problems taking gameplay screenshots using my usual method (eg: using “print screen” and pasting the image into MS Paint didn’t work [Edit: And, no, I didn’t know what the Windows 10 “Game Bar” was when I prepared this review]). So, apologies about the lack of screenshots in this review.

Anyway, let’s take a look at “Shadow Warrior (2013)”.

The game begins with a mysterious animated cutscene about demonic creatures in another world. Then we see Lo Wang, a top assassin for a powerful man called Zilla, rocking out to some classic ’80s hair metal whilst he drives through the forest to meet a man called Mizayaki.

Mizayaki has an ancient sword called the Nobitsura Kage and Zilla wants it. So, Lo Wang makes Mizayaki an offer, two million in cash or death. Mizayaki, of course, chooses the third option – commanding his henchmen to kill Lo Wang. Needless to say, this doesn’t end well for the henchmen. But, when Lo Wang confronts Mizayaki, he is captured after Mizayaki summons a mysterious supernatural creature.

After escaping, Lo Wang decides to get revenge on Mizayaki and his henchmen. However, there is just one problem, the henchmen are already dead and the surrounding area is filled with hideous demonic monsters….

One of the first things that I will say about this game is that, even though it’s a bit different to the 1997 classic, it is still a hell of a lot of fun 🙂 In essence, this game is like a “Shadow Warrior”-themed version of something like “Painkiller” or “Serious Sam” – with much more of an emphasis on fast-paced combat than on exploration or puzzle-solving. Even so, this game still keeps a lot of what made the original game enjoyable, whilst also adding some more modern features and drastically improving both the story and characters too.

As mentioned earlier, the gameplay focuses heavily on fast-paced combat – with Lo Wang having to clear arena-like portions of each level before he can progress. This combat is a really cool mixture of the original game’s combat (eg: you can carry lots of different weapons, battles are ludicrously gory, you can use some monster body parts as weapons etc..) and some more modern innovations.

In addition to being able to upgrade your weapons (eg: alternate fire modes etc..) and/or melee attacks with bonuses/coins you find in-game (no micro-transactions here 🙂 ), there is also a lot more emphasis on melee combat than in the original game. Lo Wang’s katana becomes more powerful throughout the game and remains a surprisingly useful weapon in even the later levels – plus, you get a higher score after each battle if you use it.

In addition to this, there are a few “standard” FPS game weapons (eg: shotgun, machine gun, rocket launcher etc..) and some creative 1990s-style weapons like a crossbow, throwing stars, magical abilities (that require button combos), a flamethrower and a couple of monster body parts. Plus, the basic pistol reminded me a little bit of Deckard’s revolver from “Blade Runner” too 🙂

Given the more combat-focused nature of the game, a lot of effort has been put into this part of the game. Many battles will be frenetic, crunchy and blood-drenched things where you’ll be dodging, healing and fighting in equal measure. Not only does the game help you out with generous ammo caches (and the option to “buy” ammo with coins you find in-game), but it also has a really cool health system too.

In addition to finding 1990s-style health kits lying around and being able to take health from some defeated monsters, you can also replenish health at any time using a special ability. However, to avoid the unfair boredom of *ugh* regenerating health, this ability actually requires skill to use.

In other words, you have to tap a button combination and hold the right mouse button to heal. Doing this quickly in the middle of a fast-paced battle can be a challenge in it’s own right and is made a little bit more forgiving by the fact that Lo Wang can still fight (with reduced accuracy etc..) whilst healing. Likewise, Lo Wang’s attacks also become more powerful when he drops below a certain health percentage. It’s a really good middle-ground between the mercilessly unforgiving health systems of old and ludicrously over-protective modern ones.

The game also keeps the constant combat interesting via a fairly decent difficulty curve and – more crucially- excellent monster variety too 🙂 In classic 1990s style, there are several types of low-level monsters with different attacks, there are teleporting and shield-bearing mid-level monsters and there are also about three types of larger monsters that pose a serious challenge to the player. The toughest of these are stone creatures that can only be harmed by shooting a weak spot on their back. They only appear in about four or five moments in the game, but each one of these moments is practically a boss battle in it’s own right.

And, yes, there are boss battles too. In the style of a game like “Painkiller”, the bosses are absolutely gigantic – and, in true 1990s fashion, they have to be defeated in a very specific way too 🙂 Yes, the game tells you what to do and keeps feeding you a steady supply of ammo, but it’s still really cool to see this style of boss battle in a modern FPS 🙂

As for the level design, it is very linear – to the point where most of the “secret areas” are practically in plain sight. After each battle, the game will quite literally tell you where to go next via glowing doors/gates. Although it’s sad to see a remake of something like “Shadow Warrior” succumbing to this dreary modern trend, this is mitigated quite a bit by the “Serious Sam”-inspired gameplay.

In other words, the game uses linear level design as a way of placing the player in lots of fun fast-paced arena battles. Not only that, the levels all look really beautiful and have a decent variety between urban, rural, industrial, snow and hell-like areas to keep things interesting too. Seriously, it’s so nice to see 1990s-style visual variety in this game 🙂

Following on with my comments about how this game balances 1990s and modern features, the saving system is a really strange mixture of the dreaded checkpoint saving and the proper “save anywhere” system that should be mandatory in FPS games on the PC. Although you only have one save file per profile and the game will auto-save after every level segment, the game’s menu includes a “save” button that functions a lot like the quicksave feature in many older games.

Best of all, in true 1990s FPS fashion, this game actually has personality and a sense of humour 🙂 Unlike the 1997 original, the game’s humour is a lot more sarcastic and, although some of the things that Lo Wang will shout during battle seem a bit generic, there are still quite a few funny lines, a few pop culture references (eg: I’m sure I heard Eddie Izzard’s “cake or death?” referenced at one point 🙂 ), easter eggs and loads of comedic dialogue exchanges.

And, in true modern fashion, this game actually has a story and characterisation. Although Lo Wang’s character arc is the classic “a badass becomes even more of a badass” one, he is more of a “realistic” character than he was in the 1997 game. He also spends most of the game accompanied by a supernatural character called Hoji – who has a much more complex and interesting backstory that is slowly revealed throughout the game. Not only does this make Hoji a more complex character, but it also means that the events of the game end up taking on a truly epic level of drama and significance too 🙂

The voice-acting is really good and fits in well with the characters, giving them personality whilst also being much more “realistic” than the cartoonish/stereotypical voice-acting in the 1997 game. However, the game’s background music is the kind of ambient instrumental music that you’d expect from a modern game. It adds atmosphere to the levels, but isn’t really as memorable as the more distinctive tunes (eg: Doom’s E1M1 music, Duke 3D’s “Grabbag” theme etc..) that used to be a mainstay of the FPS genre in the 1990s.

As for length, this is a full-length game consisting of about seventeen or eighteen levels. And, in terms of actual gameplay time, it didn’t differ that much from a re-play of the original 1997 game. Of course, your mileage may vary, but this is still a decent medium to long game. Plus, things like a survival mode and an unlockable “Ex mode” (where you can start the game with everything you ended it with) also add some replay value to the game too.

All in all, even though there are some major gameplay differences, this is a really great mixture of the old and the new 🙂 Plus, it’s great to see a modern FPS that has been designed primarily for PC gamers rather than ported over from a console. Yes, it has more in common with something like “Serious Sam” or “Painkiller” than the original “Shadow Warrior”, but if you want a modern FPS game that contains things that used to be standard in the 1990s (eg: personality, creativity, fun, humour, ludicrous gibs etc..) then this one is well-worth playing 🙂

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it might just get a five.

Review: “Skylar And Plux: Adventure On Clover Island” (Computer Game)

Well, since I’m still reading the next novel I plan to review (“A Wanted Man” By Lee Child) and am also still playing the other modern games I planned to review, I thought that I’d take a look at an indie 3D Platform game from 2017 called “Skylar And Plux: Adventure On Clover Island” that I completed shortly before writing this review.

This was a game that I ended up buying on a whim after I noticed that it was on sale on GOG last Christmas (and, yes, I write these reviews very far in advance). Since I have a lot of nostalgic memories of playing old 3D platform games (eg: “Jak and Daxter”, “Ratchet And Clank” etc..) on the Playstation 2 when I was a teenager, getting this game seemed like a no-brainer.

Although my refurbished modern computer – with it’s Intel HD 2500 integrated graphics- seemed to be slightly below the system requirements, I decided to take a chance. And, with low graphics settings, the game mostly ran at a playable speed (apart from a few infrequent moments of slowdown and some pop-up scenery). Although I should point out that these low graphics settings will be reflected in the screenshots in this review.

So, let’s take a look at “Skylar And Plux: Adventure On Clover Island”:

Woo hoo! It’s one of these games 🙂

The game begins on a space station. You play as Skylar, a cyborg cat who has had her memory wiped by an evil robot villain called CRT who wants to turn her into one of his minions. However, due to a series of mishaps in the station’s training course, Skylar ends up in an escape pod.

When she crash lands on the planet below, a talking owl called Plux rushes towards the pod, hoping that it is his father returning from outer space. Although he is disappointed, he decides to team up with Skylar. It also soon becomes obvious that CRT has started taking over the planet, with three parts of an ancient artefact missing, evil robots patrolling the planet and many of the planet’s adorable creatures, called L’oa, trapped in cages….

One of the first things that I will say about this game is that, even though it has some flaws, it is a really fun and nostalgic game in a genre that doesn’t appear on the PC that often. If you don’t go into it with “AAA” expectations, then you’ll find it a surprisingly compelling experience. Seriously, it’s so cool to see a modern PC game that is influenced by things like “Ratchet And Clank”, “Jak And Daxter” etc…

Seriously, why do hardly any of these games appear on the PC?

In terms of the gameplay, it consists of platforming, puzzles, exploration and combat. The emphasis here is on platforming and exploration, which are also the best elements of the game. The platforming segments are challenging enough to be fun, but reasonably forgiving too (thanks to things like double-jumps, a jetpack power-up, a time-slowing power-up etc..). Seriously, if you loved old-school PS2 3D platformers, then you’ll be in your element here 🙂

The design/layout of the platforms is really good. However….

However, one problem with the platforming is that, because this game was primarily designed to be played with a controller (which I don’t have), there is not only no option to customise the keyboard controls (which can be a bit counter-intuitive, like pressing “F” to interact with things etc..) but, more critically, I couldn’t find a mouse sensitivity option either.

Given that the default mouse sensitivity is absolutely sky-high, you’ll sometimes find yourself fighting with the camera during some fast-paced platforming segments. That is when the camera doesn’t freeze upon respawning (and only becomes moveable again after pressing “Esc” twice). Still, once you get used to these small annoyances, the platforming is really enjoyable.

In terms of exploration, this game is really cool. Although the levels are mostly typical 3D platform levels that have one “correct” path, a few parts are slightly more non-linear and there’s also a really interesting hub level too.

Not only are there a few interesting side-areas to explore in the hub area, but you can also meet rescued creatures too 🙂

The player is also given an incentive to explore because every level -except for the tutorial and final boss battle- contains several imprisoned L’oa that can be rescued. Not only do they make the most adorable crying and celebration sounds you’ll ever hear but, for every five that you rescue, you can return to the hub level and increase your maximum lives too.

The sound effects here are adorable. Only someone with a heart of stone wouldn’t rescue this creature.

The game’s lives system is fairly interesting. Although you’ll lose one whenever you take damage or fall off of a platform, they can be easily recovered by picking up enough of the plentiful in-game gems (which you’ll also need to rescue the L’oa). Likewise, although the game uses the dreaded checkpoint saving, this is reasonably forgiving and you’ll also have access to a fast-travel map at many checkpoints too (even if you have to move the cursor on it using the WSAD keys instead of the mouse).

Another cool thing about the game’s exploration elements is the art design. Even at low graphics settings, this game still looks really wonderful. It has the kind of whimsical, cartoonish and vaguely cel-shaded art style that made me really nostalgic for the days when games could be a bit more cheerful and stylised 🙂 Seriously, this game looks like a modern version of some of the best PS2 platformers I’ve seen 🙂

And, even on the lowest graphics settings, it still looks more spectacular than the PS2 too 🙂

The game’s combat is less frequent than I’d expected, and this is a good thing because it’s one of the weakest elements of the game. In addition to Skylar having no ranged attacks (and just three melee attacks), you’ll be fighting groups of tiny robots and a few annoying projectile-firing robots too. Although these combat segments become significantly easier, and more satisfying, once you’ve got the power-ups that can slow time and/or magnetise Skylar, expect a bit of frustration earlier in the game.

Plus, the game also includes an old-school puzzle-based boss fight too. Like in many classic games, there is a very specific way to defeat the boss and it is up to you to work it out. Likewise, although the final boss battle is the most challenging part of the game, it is still forgiving enough that you’ll probably be able to beat it after six or seven goes once you’ve worked out what you’re supposed to do.

Plus, given the lack of boss battles in the rest of the game, this part really caught me by surprise when I thought I’d finished the game.

In terms of the puzzles, this game is mostly ok. Although I’m not really a fan of puzzles in games, and aren’t that good at them, it’s an integral part of this genre. Many of the puzzles here are relatively easy and can be solved with a little bit of thought.

However, there were two frustrating slider-based puzzles (in the vaguely Zelda-inspired temple level, which also includes a cool “turning back time” mechanic) that led to me consulting a walkthrough on Youtube. Even so, puzzles are more of an occasional part of this game and most of them are reasonably straightforward.

Except for this one and the one directly after it….

Although the gameplay has some flaws, this is still a really fun game once you get used to them. Not only that, like the 3D platformers of old, this game also has personality too. Although a lot of this is done through the art style and gameplay, a fair amount is also done through dialogue.

The voice-acting and script in this game is quite literally “so bad that it’s good”. This is impossible to describe fully in a text review, but the game’s voice cast ham it up and/or phone it in majestically. Likewise, the script also contains so much cheesiness, corniness, cliche and random comedy (with the best examples being an early 2000s-style Limp Bizkit reference, almost all of CRT’s dialogue and the fact that Plux’s squeaky voice briefly drops several octaves when you find an artefact piece), that it actually becomes fun after a while.

Add to this the hilarious PG-rated “edginess” (eg: “Let’s get the funk out of here!” etc…) and the hilariously predictable, earnest and/or melodramatic “serious” parts of the story and this game’s narrative elements are some of the funniest things I’ve seen in a while.

As for the game’s sound design, there is some wonderful acoustic background music (with the highlights being the Ancient Egypt-style music and the hub level music) and the sound effects are also fairly decent too, with the highlight being the rescued/trapped L’oa creatures that I mentioned earlier. Seriously, the sound design in this game will make you nostalgic for the glory days of the Playstation 2.

I should probably also mention the game’s length too. Although I’ve seen this game described as “short”, this is mostly in comparison to the gigantic “AAA” 3D platformers of old. This game took me about 7-9 hours to complete (if you’re an expert at 3D platformers and/or are using a controller, then YMMV) and felt like a fairly satisfying short-medium length experience that never really seemed padded or rushed. It’s sort of a quality over quantity thing. Basically, if you remember that it’s a lower-budget “AA” game, if you want a game you can actually complete in a couple of days and/or if you wait until it is on sale, then the game’s relatively short length won’t be an issue.

All in all, whilst this game isn’t perfect, I had a lot of fun with it. If you can get over the clunky mouse/keyboard controls, the less than perfect combat, the occasional frustrating puzzle and the “so bad that it’s good” voice-acting/script, then there’s a really enjoyable game to be found here. It’s a really awesome, if somewhat rough around the edges, low-budget love letter to the early 2000s heyday of the 3D platfomer genre and this is really cool to see 🙂

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get at least three and three-quarters.

Review: “Gone Home” (Computer Game)

Well, I thought that I’d take a very short break from book reviews to review a computer game that I’d planned to review about two years ago.

Back then, I happened to notice that the game “Gone Home” (2013) was on sale on GOG and since I’d heard that it was set in the 1990s and since it used something that looked like the Source Engine (in reality, the game uses Unity), I decided to get a copy… only to find that the vintage mid-2000s computer I was using at the time didn’t have enough VRAM to run it.

But since, for various reasons, I got a vaguely modern refurbished computer (eg: Core i5-3570, 8gb RAM etc.. Which, by my standards, is practially futuristic) the day before I wrote this review, I suddenly remembered this game and decided to re-download it and take a look at it.

So, let’s take a look at “Gone Home”. Needless to say, this review may contain some PLOT SPOILERS.

“Gone Home” is set in 1995 and begins with university student Kaitlin Greenbriar returning home to her family’s new house in Oregon after a gap year in Europe. However, when she gets back, she finds that no-one is there. So, she has to search the house for clues about what has happened….

Surprisingly, despite the gloomy atmosphere, this ISN’T a horror game.

One of the first things that I will say about this game is that, whilst it has a few flaws, it’s a really interesting narrative game. If you enjoy exploration, ominous mansions and/or anything 1990s-related, then it’s worth taking a look at this game.

Since this game is the classic example of a “walking simulator”, the main types of gameplay here are exploration, detective work and a small amount of puzzle solving.

In short, the game involves searching the house for clues about what has happened and for audio logs from Kaitlyn’s younger sister, Sam. As an interactive story, it works really well – with the game’s story being this bittersweet tale that will probably make you cry at least once or twice and will linger in your imagination for a while after you’ve finished playing.

The exploration elements of the game are really cool too, with lots of interesting background items to examine, atmospheric lighting, “ordinary” 1990s rooms and even a few secret passages. Seriously, I absolutely love the idea of a game that revolves around exploring somewhere (that isn’t a mostly-empty open world). Seriously, this is a game that is very much about place, atmosphere and subtle retro nostalgia 🙂

And there’s some awesome 1990s-style lighting too 🙂 Of course, when you turn the lights on, it disappears…

And, I vaguely remember seeing THESE word processors in shops when I was younger too. Nostalgia 🙂

VHS and audio cassettes 🙂 Yes!

Literally the only complaint I have about this element of the game is the movement speed. Yes, it might be because I’m used to older FPS games, but the movement speed here can best be described as “glacial”, which can sometimes make the interesting exploration feel like a bit of a chore and/or a way of padding out the length of the game.

But, this is worth putting up with given the sheer amount of background details, quirky notes, subtle humour, retro technology, 1990s punk music etc… that you’ll find. Seriously, if you’re a fan of 1990s US TV shows/movies, then it’s really cool to see a game that focuses on this period of American history 🙂

The truth is out there!

Likewise, the fact that the game is set in an ordinary house (albeit a mansion-sized one) allows for a surprising level of realism that will probably evoke a small amount of 1990s nostalgia (even if, like me, you grew up in 1990s Britain rather than America).

Another cool thing about this game is that most of the game’s documents are handwritten, which gives everything a lot more personality than typical in-game text 🙂

Seriously, whilst the game’s “walking simulator” concept is very different to a traditional game, it’s really cool to see a game that focuses so much on subtle, “realistic” 1990s nostalgia 🙂 Even if, as I mentioned, the movement speed is a bit on the slow side.

As mentioned earlier, this game also contains a few *ugh* puzzles too. Since I’m not really a fan of puzzle games (and am terrible at them), I eventually had to resort to a walkthrough for many of them.

And then was astonished that I missed an obvious clue like this one!

Even so, the puzzles are solvable if you are willing to search, think and examine everything. Plus, the 1990s was a decade when even first-person shooter games included puzzles (it was the “crafting system”, “permadeath” etc.. of it’s day), so it’s good to see that they have got this nostalgic element of the game right 🙂

In terms of the story, atmosphere and characters, this game is really brilliant 🙂 Although Kaitlin is the player character, the main character of this game is her sister Sam, whose story the game tells.

This is a surprisingly poignant, bittersweet and emotional tale that is relayed through audio logs, realistic notes/scribbles (social media wasn’t really a thing in the 1990s) and it really adds a level of humanity to the game that you might not expect. For a character who you never actually meet, Sam is one of the most well-written game characters I’ve seen in a while.

Not to mention how the location design in this game also adds a lot of extra characterisation and personality too.

Thematically, the game is a story about love, about the grinding conformity of 1990s suburbia, about secrets, about the awesomeness of discovering punk music when you were a kid in the 1990s (in the game, this is “Riot Grrl” style punk. But, it still reminded me of the first time I heard The Offspring, AFI, Sum 41 etc..), about dysfunctional families etc… So, yes, this game is a bit more complex and intelligent than you might think.

In terms of the atmosphere, this game is wonderful. In addition to lots of subtly realistic 1990s background details, there are also quite a few ’90s pop culture references (and a few punk songs too), lots of wonderfully gloomy lighting and some wonderful rain/thunder sound effects too.

Although this game isn’t a horror game, this gloom really goes well with the game’s bittersweet story and helps to add a lot to the game. Not to mention that creeping around gloomy mansions is always fun (and very ’90s too – I mean, just look at “Resident Evil”, “Alone In The Dark”, the ghost house levels in “Super Mario World” etc…).

Yes, seriously, this ISN’T a horror game.

In terms of length, this is a famously short game. Using a walkthrough for most of the puzzles, I completed it in about two hours and fifteen minutes. But, if you don’t use a walkthrough, then it’ll probably take you a little bit longer.

Even so, this game is about the right length for the story it tells. It’s the computer game equivalent of a novella or a longer short story. But, it’s probably best to wait until this game goes on sale before getting it (since a lot of the anger about this game’s length probably comes from people who paid full price and had full price expectations).

All in all, whilst this game has a few flaws, I really love the concept of it. It’s a 1990s nostalgia game that involves exploring a gloomy mansion 🙂 It’s quirky, bittersweet, atmospheric, poignant, occasionally funny and it has a level of realism and humanity to it that you don’t often see in games.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would just about get a four.

Review: “Resident Evil 3” (PC Version) (Retro Computer Game)

Well, because I’m still reading the next novel I plan to review (“Transition” by Iain Banks) and because I had a bit more time whilst reading another novel, I thought that I’d take the chance to replay an old favourite of mine 🙂

I am, of course, talking about Capcom’s 1999 survival horror classic “Resident Evil 3” (or, more accurately, the PC port of it from 2000). After all, I’ve reviewed the film adaptation of this game and the novelisation of the film (but I haven’t got round to re-reading S.D. Perry’s novelisation of the game yet). So, I’m kind of surprised that I haven’t reviewed the actual game itself yet.

This is a game which I first played on the Playstation during the early-mid 2000s and then replayed it at least once when I found a version of it that ran on the PC (during the late 2000s, if I remember rightly). So, I thought that I’d replay it yet again – albeit in “easy mode”, mostly for time reasons.

Anyway, let’s take a look at “Resident Evil 3”. Needless to say, this review may contain some (unrealistic) GRUESOME IMAGES.

*Sigh* I miss the days of budget games, second-hand game shops and when the BBFC was hilariously over-zealous about displaying age certificates on games.

The events of “Resident Evil 3” take place during the same time period as the events of “Resident Evil 2“. It is the late 1990s and the American city of Racoon City has been infected by a zombie virus, leaving the streets crawling with the undead.

Jill Valentine, star of the first “Resident Evil” game, must explore, puzzle and fight her way through the city and reach safety. Not only that, there’s also a giant mutant called “Nemesis” chasing her too.

And, yes, he’s the kind of gnarly heavy metal monster you’d expect to see on an Iron Maiden album cover.

One of the first things that I will say about “Resident Evil 3” is that, whilst I should be cynical about it, I absolutely adore this game 🙂 Even though I’m more nostalgic about “Resident Evil 2”, I’ve probably replayed this game more times than any other horror game. It’s just the right mixture of challenging, spectacular and fun. This is probably because it was designed for both die-hard fans of the series and for people who are new to the series.

On the one hand, things like the slightly more action-packed gameplay, the “easy” difficulty option (on the PC at least) and the game’s (ridiculously silly) costume design were designed to appeal to the “mainstream” and/or “casual” gamers of the late 1990s/early 2000s. But, for fans of the series, the game contains numerous awesome call-backs and references to previous games in the franchise – with the core gameplay not being too different either.

Not only does Brad Vickers have a cameo in this game, but you also get to explore part of the police station from “Resident Evil 2” too 🙂

Surprisingly, this dual focus actually works really well and it turns the game into it’s own distinctive thing. But, I should probably start by talking about the gameplay.

Whilst the exploration, puzzle and combat gameplay is fairly similar to the previous two games and is something of an acquired taste (eg: modern gamers might take a while to get used to the movement/combat controls, the animation that plays every time you walk through a door, the fixed camera angles, the limited inventory space and the obtuse puzzles), there are numerous cool additions which help to give the game more depth and drama.

Whether it is the much wider range of locations to explore, the fact that there’s now a “dodge” move (and an auto-aim feature), the inclusion of exploding barrels or the fact that this game contains refreshingly limited early versions of over-used modern things like quick-time events and a crafting system, this game feels a little bit more action-packed and “cinematic” than the first two games in the series. Yet, unlike what I’ve heard about some of the later sequels, this game doesn’t lose it’s identity and turn into a generic mindless action-fest either.

Yes, the only “quick time events” in this game are a few multiple choice questions 🙂

Likewise, the only “crafting” here is a fairly basic gunpowder-mixing system 🙂

This is helped a lot by the inclusion of difficulty settings (in the PC version at least) – if you play on “hard mode”, then the game is more of a traditional survival horror game, with fairly limited ammunition, limited saves and lots of other things that really help to ramp up the suspense and tension. Yes, the auto-aim makes the game a bit easier than previous instalments, but it’s still reasonably similar.

If you play on “easy mode”, then you get unlimited saves (but you still have to use fixed save points) and lots of extra weaponry – which makes the game a bit more relaxing, action-packed and “casual”. So, you can choose what type of game you want it to be – which is really cool.

On “hard” difficulty, this game is a tense, challenging old-school survival horror game.

But, on “easy” difficulty, it’s more of a wonderfully badass action-horror game 🙂 [and, yes, the exploding barrels are also there in “hard” difficulty too]

Still, one change I’m a little ambivalent about is the lack of character selection. Yes, there are technically two playable characters (eg: Jill and Carlos) – but the game switches between them automatically at certain points in the story. In other words, you don’t get two separate campaigns in the way that you did in the previous two games. On the one hand, this means you only get half a game. On the other hand, it does make the story a little bit more streamlined and varied.

As for the graphics and visual design, they are awesome 🙂 Yes, even with the PC version’s enhanced graphics, the game’s 3D models and CGI cutscenes still look pretty dated. However, this game has aged really well visually thanks to all of the really awesome pre-rendered backgrounds, dramatic camera angles and dramatic lighting. Seriously, I love old-school pre-rendered backgrounds and this game is an absolute work of art 🙂

Seriously, the background here could almost be something out of “Blade Runner” 🙂

And just check out the awesome lighting here 🙂 Seriously, people knew how to use lighting properly during the 1990s 🙂

And just look at all of the background detail here 🙂

In terms of the game’s horror elements, whilst you shouldn’t expect something genuinely scary (unlike, say, “Silent Hill 3), this game is a pretty decent horror game.

In addition to all of the suspense that things like the limited inventory, saves and/or camera angles can provoke – this game also uses jump scares slightly more frequently and effectively than the previous two games in the franchise usually do.

Boo!!! With the exception of the “Dog” scene from the first game, this game has some of the best jump scares in the old “Resident Evil” games 🙂

Other horror elements include the creepily unwelcome return of the series’ giant spider monsters too. Likewise, you can also find lots of ominous in-game documents describing the spread of the zombie virus. Plus, of course, there’s also a really awesome scene where some zombies quite literally rise from the grave….

This is so cool 🙂

In terms of the writing and the characters, they’re “so bad that they’re good”. Whether it’s the series’ traditional hilariously awful voice-acting, the gloriously wooden script, the minimalist characterisation/story or the ridiculously silly costume design….

Note how these experienced, well-trained zombie fighters wear sensible protective clothing like sleeveless vests, tube tops and mini skirts.

…. This game is utterly hilarious. But, this is part of the charm of the series. It was the 1990s, a more laid-back age when “dramatic” games could be hilariously silly. When games were still “low culture” in the same way that old pulp novels, horror comics, B-movies etc.. were.

Plus, in addition to having better 3D models, the ability to skip cutscenes/ door animations and the inclusion of more difficulty options, one interesting feature of the PC version of the game is that the unlockable costume selection option in the Playstation version is unlocked by default (and also now contains something like eight different options too).

And, yes, you can play as the “Resident Evil 1” version of Jill too.

In terms of the game’s music, it is the kind of dramatic, suspenseful, spectacular orchestral music that you’d expect from a classic “Resident Evil” game. In other words, it is absolutely epic 🙂

All in all, whilst this game is a bit of an acquired taste, it is a hell of a lot of fun 🙂 If you miss classic survival horror games, if you want a gloriously cheesy “B-movie” of a game, if you want to wander the streets of a post-apocalyptic city or if you just miss the creativity of the 1990s, then this game is well worth playing 🙂 If you want a tense survival horror game, play it on “hard” difficulty. If you want a fun, slightly quicker and gloriously silly action game, play it on “easy”.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, then I’d personally give it a five 🙂 But, more objectively, it’s probably more like a four or a three and a half.

Partial Review: “Enclave” (PC Version) (Retro game)

Sometimes, there are reasonably enjoyable games that get overlooked. A computer game from 2002 called “Enclave” is one of those games. I hadn’t even really heard of it before until I happened to notice it during a sale (where it had been reduced to about 99p) on GOG a couple of weeks before I prepared this partial review.

And, yes, this will be a partial review. Basically, due to getting distracted by other stuff, I’ve only got up to the final level of the game’s “light” campaign. So, this will be more than just a ‘first impressions’ article, but less than a proper full review.

So, let’s take a look at “Enclave”:

“Enclave” is a fantasy-themed “hack and slash” action game from 2002. Interestingly, the game lets you choose whether you play as the “light” or “dark” side in an epic Tolkien-esque fantasy story. However, it seems like the “dark” campaign doesn’t unlock until you complete the “light” campaign – so, this review will just focus on this one side of the story.

To sum up the story of the “light” campaign – you have to escape from prison, defend a small city from the forces of darkness and then go on an epic quest across a nightmarish wasteland in order to find and gain the support of various allies. Just imagine all of the epic parts from the “Lord Of The Rings” films and this will give you a fairly good idea of what to expect:

You. Shall. Not. Pass!!!!!!! … And, yes, you can play as a wizard in some of the later levels.

The game also occasionally includes some vaguely steampunk elements too – like this vaguely “Riven”/”Myst”-like location.

And, yes, the “Lord Of The Rings” movies are an excellent comparison to make. This is mostly because the bulk of the “light” campaign involves fighting goblins, orcs etc…

Although there are some mild puzzle-solving elements occasionally, this game is a proper action game – in that you will be spending most of the time swinging swords, shooting arrows or casting spells.

And, some parts of the game look like a heavy metal album cover too 🙂

Although the hit detection in this game is a little clunky and the combat can feel a little bit imprecise at times, it is kept reasonably fun and interesting due to the variety of enemy types, the challenging difficulty, a few boss battles, the fact that this game is almost like a heavy metal album (except for the music) in videogame form and the level of character customisation available.

Technically, you play as a group of characters… and they all actually appear in one cutscene.

Although you start the “light” campaign with just one character (the knight), more characters become available as the game continues.

Each character has different strengths and weaknesses, and you can also choose their weapons, armour etc.. too. These things are unlocked by completing levels and by finding in-game bonus items (and, unlike in greedy modern games, you can only get in-game gold by earning it via gameplay 🙂).

See that cool-looking fiery sword. You’ll actually unlock it via gameplay 🙂 Yes, this game is from the glorious age before *ugh* micro-transactions were a thing 🙂

This high level of customisation also means that, if you’re having trouble with one level, then you can try it with a different character type or with different weapons.

The character types are sort of what you’d expect, and the best character in the “light” campaign is probably either the “halfling” character – who is a badass heavy metal/punk warrior who has scary facial tattoos, can move quickly, can use the game’s best swords, who grins maniacally whilst fighting etc.. or the “knight” character – who is a badass Roman gladiator/barbarian style character, and is also pretty metal too.

Once you’ve got some decent armour (as opposed to the default crop top) and a good shield, then the halfling is probably the best character in the game.

You can also play as a cool Roman gladiator/barbarian-style character too 🙂

The worst character is probably the “druid” character, who is an elf-like character who has little to no protection against damage (probably due to wearing a swimming costume into battle) and has a few magic-based attacks that are shared with a much cooler Gandalf-like wizard character you can unlock later.

Plus, some characters only become good later in the game when more weapons become available. The “huntress” character is a good example of this. She’s a character who specialises in using longbows and crossbows. Whilst she is playable from the second level onwards, she’s only really a good choice a few levels later – when you can equip her with some of the more powerful bows and arrows, and when you’ll find yourself in situations where you’re faced with fighting long-range adversaries from a distance.

Although the huntress is playable from the second level onwards, she’s a terrible choice for levels that involve lots of close combat (like the second level).

In terms of level design, this game is reasonably good. Although most of the levels are reasonably linear, there are occasional non-linear segments, set pieces and easy puzzles that help to prevent it from becoming monotonous. Not only that, the variety of locations on offer in this game is pretty good too:

There’s even a really awesome “Ancient Rome”-style level too 🙂

Which even includes a beach area and a gladiatorial arena too 🙂

But, saying all of this, it is very clear that this game was originally designed with consoles (rather than computers) in mind. This is most notable with regard to the game’s saving system.

Whilst you can go back and play levels that you’ve completed, you can’t save mid-level. Although most levels feature mid-level checkpoints (which penalise you 10 gold whenever you use them, meaning your gold counter doubles up as a “lives” system), the only way to save your progress is to let the game auto-save at the end of each level…. and only at the end of each level.

Yes, if you leave the game after finding a mid-level checkpoint, then you’ll have to restart the entire level next time…

Since some of the levels can take 15-30 minutes to complete and since the difficulty level of some of the later levels is very much on the challenging side of things, this can cause a lot of frustration! Still, thanks to the character customisation and the relatively short length of the levels, it won’t take too long before you’ll feel like having another go at the more challenging levels.

Plus, this saving system encourages you to play the game in shorter bursts, which means that the combat won’t feel as repetitive as it might do if you played for longer periods of time.

In terms of music, voice-acting and general presentation, this game is fairly good. Whilst it would have been cool if there had been heavy metal music on the game’s soundtrack, the game’s more traditional “epic fantasy” music is pretty cool.

Likewise, the game’s animated menus and pre-rendered cutscenes still look pretty impressive to this day (less so with the in-game cutscenes though). The voice-acting is a little bit more variable, but there isn’t that much of it and even the cornier examples of it are “so bad that it’s good”.

One thing that helps with the pre-rendered cutscenes is that they mostly involve looking at a book, which is probably easier to render realistically with early-mid 2000s computer graphics.

In terms of length, this game is fairly reasonable. Although the “light” campaign contains 14 levels (some of which are fairly challenging) and probably at least 10-20 hours of gameplay, the fact that there is another campaign (the “dark” campaign) that can be unlocked when you complete this means that this is anything but a “short” game.

All in all, this is a fun (if occasionally frustrating) epic fantasy action game. If you like heavy metal album covers, gleefully mindless action games, the epic battle scenes in the “Lord Of The Rings” movies and things that are “so bad that they’re good”, then you’ll absolutely love this game 🙂 Yes, it certainly isn’t a perfect game, but it is something of an overlooked gem and it’s worth picking up when it goes on sale…

If I had to give what I’ve played of this game a rating out of five, it would just about maybe get a four.