Review: “Dawnbreaker” By Jocelynn Drake (Novel)

First of all, happy New Year everyone 🙂 Although I hadn’t planned to start the year with a book review, it’s been a couple of days since the last one. So, with that said, I thought that I’d take a look at the third novel in Jocelynn Drake’s brilliant “Dark Days” series (you can see my reviews of the first two books here and here).

Needless to say, this series is best read in the correct order. And, although it is theoretically possible to read “Dawnbreaker” as a stand-alone novel (since it contains a few recaps), it is a sequel to the first two novels and you’ll get a lot more out of it if you read those first.

Anyway, let’s take a look at “Dawnbreaker”. Needless to say, this review will contain some SPOILERS.

This is the 2009 EOS (US) paperback edition of “Dawnbreaker” that I read.

“Dawnbreaker” begins during a spectacular car chase in Mira’s home city of Savannah. Mira, Tristan, Knox and Amanda are trying to escape a hit-squad of naturi who are out for their blood. More specifically, Mira wants to get out of the city in order to reduce any potential witnesses or human casualties from the inevitable battle that will follow.

Of course, when they stop outside town, the naturi attack in force and the battle seems to be turning in the naturi’s favour until Danaus shows up to save the day. After this, they all return to Mira’s mansion outside town where she reluctantly offers to begin a vampiric “family” in order to protect Knox and Amanda. After spelling out the risks, Mira gives them both a day or two to decide.

But, before long, Amanda has been kidnapped by the naturi, several werewolves are dead and Barrett is furious. Believing Mira’s presence to be the cause of all of the recent troubles, he warns her to leave the city or face his wrath…..

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is that it is absolutely spectacular. It is a really good mixture of the fast-paced action-thriller elements of the first novel and the more suspenseful elements of the second novel. But, in addition to this, it also contains the kind of grand sweeping drama that you’d expect from the third novel in any series.

The structure of this novel is pretty interesting too – with the first half of the story taking place in Savannah. This is a tense, suspenseful and claustrophobic segment of the novel that is filled with eruptions of violence, daring missions, uneasy truces and frayed friendships. This is also helped by the introduction of a couple of new characters (Cynnia and Shelly) who Mira isn’t sure whether she can fully trust or not.

This then elegantly segues back in the main over-arching story of the series, with the rest of the novel taking place in South America – where Mira and her allies must try to stop the final sacrifice that will re-open the door between Earth and the realm of the naturi. Needless to say, this is the more “epic” part of the novel where Mira must try to stop the naturi returning in force or die trying.

In terms of the horror elements in this novel, there aren’t as many as there were in the previous novels. Yes, there’s a lot of vampiric stuff etc… (including a scene involving a besieged hotel that reminded me of something from a 1990s-style horror movie) but the main emphasis of this story is on drama, suspense and action rather than horror.

Even so, this works really well and the novel remains just as compelling as the previous two. This is also helped by the fact that the story expands on some of the background stuff introduced in the previous novel, whilst also adding some compelling new details too (eg: hints about Mira’s abilities, more details about the naturi, the implications of what Danaus is etc..).

In terms of the narration in this novel, it’s a little bit more on the “matter of fact” side of things, but it still works really well (since it’s a thriller novel as well as a horror/fantasy novel). But, after getting this far into the series, Mira’s constant descriptions of pain, injuries etc.. do get a little bit repetitive. Even so, the story’s first-person narration still retains a lot of the personality and uniqueness that you would expect.

Although this story introduces a few new characters and quite a few familiar ones make an appearance too, the story mostly remains focused on the core group of Mira, Danaus, Shelly and Cynnia. Although it was a little disappointing not to see more about Tristan and Amanda’s budding relationship, not to learn more about Michael’s replacement etc.. this novel’s focus on a small group of characters helps to keep the story dramatic, deep and focused. And it works really well 🙂

Interestingly, this novel both does and doesn’t end on a cliffhanger. Although there’s a tiny cliffhanger at the end of the final page, this story somehow both provides a really satisfying sense of resolution to some of the plot threads that have been building over the past few books, whilst still leaving a lot of stuff unresolved at the same time. It’s a brilliant payoff for reading the first two novels, but also a reminder that there are still three novels left to go.

All in all, this novel is a really spectacular mid-point to a brilliant series. It’s a good combination of the suspense elements from “Dayhunter” and the action thriller elements of “Nightwalker”. It’s a compelling novel that resolves a lot and also leaves a lot tantalisingly unresolved.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get four and a half.