Never seen before! Yet More Random Stuff From My Sketchbooks

2015 Artwork sketchbooks June sketch 2

Well, I was kind of in a rush and didn’t have time to write a proper article or review for today. So, here’s some more “never seen before” random fan art and failed paintings from the pages of my sketchbooks.

This is a random fan art drawing of Chloe from season seven of "24"

This is a random fan art drawing of Chloe from season seven of “24”

I was having some problems with the lights in my room when I drew this. So, I was curious if I could actually draw anything in the dark. Unfortunately, even after I cheated and used a torch, this picture didn't turn out that well.

I was having some problems with the lights in my room when I drew this. So, I was curious if I could actually draw anything in the dark. Unfortunately, even after I cheated and used a torch, this picture didn’t turn out that well.

This was a painting that I started the sketch for, but ended up abandoning after I couldn't think of a good enough idea for a background.

This was a painting that I started the sketch for, but ended up abandoning after I couldn’t think of a good enough idea for a background.

This was my first failed attempt at re-drawing an old picture of mine from last year called "Level 32". I ended up finishing my second attempt and posting it here, but it wasn't really that much better than this failed first attempt.

This was my first failed attempt at re-drawing an old picture of mine from last year called “Level 32”. I ended up finishing my second attempt and posting it here, but it wasn’t really that much better than this failed first attempt.

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Hopefully, I’ll write a proper article or review for tomorrow – but I hope that this was interesting 🙂

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NEVER SEEN BEFORE! Sketchbook pages and failed paintings :)

2014 Artwork It's more sketchbook pages again sketch

Well, since I can’t think of a good idea for a proper article today, I thought that I’d take you on yet another mysterious tour through the unseen pages of my sketchbooks.

And, as a bonus, I’ll also include a few failed paintings (in various stages of completion. Most of them are just unfinished lineart, but one is a finished piece of fan art I decided not to post here on the 27th October [?]) and an alternate version of a painting that I posted here back in September.

(Although it’s hopefully obvious, you can click on each of the images in this post to see a larger version of them.)

So, let’s get started 🙂

This is the original colour version of the "Not Quite Bill Hicks" painting I posted here in September.  Unforutnately, I messed up the skin tones in this picture - which made it look like something from a horror movie.

This is the original colour version of the “Not Quite Bill Hicks” painting I posted here in September. Unforutnately, I messed up the skin tones in this picture – which made it look like something from a horror movie.

It's a drawing of a Victorian villain and an account of a dream where I bought  ludicrously overpriced drinks in a restaurant.

It’s a drawing of a Victorian villain and an account of a dream where I bought ludicrously overpriced drinks in a restaurant.

This was a failed idea for a comedy painting that I'd planned to post on here a couple of weeks ago.

This was a failed idea for a comedy painting that I’d planned to post on here a couple of weeks ago.

This was my original plan for the "Seven Useless Sources Of Artistic Inspiration" cartoon I posted on here sometime in September or October (?). Sorry about the censorship, but I'm not quite sure what the rules are for profanity and nudity on WordPress.

This was my original plan for the “Seven Useless Sources Of Artistic Inspiration” cartoon I posted on here sometime in September or October (?). Sorry about the censorship, but I’m not quite sure what the rules are for profanity and nudity on WordPress.

This was an attempt to draw the sea at sunset, based on a scene I saw in an episode of "Burn Notice".

This was an attempt to draw the sea at sunset, based on a scene I saw in an episode of “Burn Notice”.

This is the unfinished lineart for a "Doom" style painting that I'd planned to make a few months ago.

This is the unfinished lineart for a “Doom” style painting that I’d planned to make a few months ago.

This was a failed attempt at making a painting of Claudia Black and Lena Headey. I'd originally planned to post this on here on the 27th October (?), but I didn't really feel like it was quite good enough - so I replaced it with a generic landscape painting at the time.

This was a failed attempt at making a painting of Claudia Black and Lena Headey. I’d originally planned to post this on here on the 27th October (?), but I didn’t really feel like it was quite good enough – so I replaced it with a generic landscape painting at the time.

These were my plans for the "April Fools' Day" article I posted here earlier this year. And, yes, I'd originally planned to include a 'trollface' picture at the end of it.

These were my plans for the “April Fools’ Day” article I posted here earlier this year. And, yes, I’d originally planned to include a ‘trollface’ picture at the end of it.

These were some random doodles based on a webcomic I made in 2010 called "Yametry Run".

These were some random doodles based on a webcomic I made in 2010 called “Yametry Run”.

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Although I’ll post my usual monthly “top ten” article here tomorrow, hopefully I’ll think of some ideas for proper (non-filler) articles for January.

Anyway, I hope that this was interesting 🙂

Six Ways To Salvage A Ruined Painting Or Drawing

2014 Artwork Salvaging Pictures Sketch

So, it all started so well. Your sketch looked great and even any inked lineart or paint that you added to your picture looked amazing… until that one fatal mistake. Maybe something got smudged, maybe the colour scheme was horribly wrong or maybe the paper even got torn? It sucks.

And it’s happened to literally every artist on the planet at least once.

However, it isn’t always as bad as it might sound. There are ways of salvaging at least most of what made your original painting or drawing so great.

Some of the methods in this article will give you ideas for creating salvaged digital versions of your picture using image editing software (after you’ve scanned or digitally photographed the original picture) like MS Paint and a free open-source program called “GIMP“, but any editing program will do. I’ll try to keep this guide non- program specific.

But I’ll also include quite a few old-fashioned analogue methods that might be useful to you if you don’t have a digital camera or a scanner or you just want to salvage the physical copy of your art.

This isn’t a step-by-step guide to how to salvage a painting, it’s more of a list of ideas and possibilities that might be worth following. Still, I hope that it can at least point you in the right direction:

1) Tracing: Although tracing is most certainly cheating when it comes to creating new art, it can be a useful non-digital way to salvage any drawings that you’ve made.

Basically you just trace all of the parts of your drawing (eg: with tracing paper or by putting two sheets of paper on top of a sturdy light source of some kind) that you got right and then re-draw the failed or damaged parts from scratch.

2) Add new stuff: This can only work in some circumstances and I’ve written about it in more detail in another article. But sometimes mistakes in your painting or drawing can be covered up by… well… literally covering them over with other things. As long as the thing you’re covering it up with is darker than the original mistake, then no-one will notice.

Yes, this will change your painting or drawing and it probably won’t look as good as your original idea for it. But, well, it can be better than nothing in some circumstances.

3) Colour selection: MS Paint (and probably most other graphics programs too) has a tool which can be incredibly useful for repairing digital copies of failed pictures. In version 5.1 of MS Paint, it’s called the “pick color” tool and the icon for it looks a bit like a dropper of some kind. The icon and name might vary from program to program, but this tool basically does the same thing.

In essence, what this tool allows you to do is to click on a part of the picture and the colour of your digital brush or pencil will automatically change to the exact colour of the exact pixel that you clicked on.

What this means is that you can then smooth out or cover over any damage or mistakes in your picture with the exact colours that were used in the picture itself, so that your repairs won’t stand out from a mile away (in the way that they would do if you just used one of the pre-made colours available in your image editing program).

4) Greyscale: If the colour choices in your original picture are absolutely terrible (eg: the colours clash or something like that), then you can salvage your picture by removing the colours altogether.

Most image editing programs have some way of either turning a picture into a simple black and white image (with literally just two colours and nothing in between) or, preferably, a proper greyscale picture (with lots of shades of grey, like an old photo).

A more old-fashioned way to do this if you don’t have a scanner or a digital camera and are near a library or copy shop is simply to run your original picture through a photocopier. Unless the copier is a state-of-the-art machine that can make colour copies, you’ll end up with a physical greyscale copy of your original picture.

If you’ve removed the colour from your picture digitally, then you can also add some colour to your picture by messing around with the “Red, Green and Blue” (RGB) levels of the image in your graphics program. Yes, this might make your picture look slightly surreal, but it can make it more interesting than a simple B&W or greyscale picture.

Here is an example of how I used this technique to salvage a picture which originally had a whole bunch of clashing colours in it. Unfortunately, I converted it to B&W rather than greyscale before messing around with the RGB levels, but the results are still interesting:

"Planet Lost" By C. A. Brown

“Planet Lost” By C. A. Brown

5) Tape: If your painting or picture is torn, then you can use different types of tape to repair it. I haven’t studied this in detail or really had to do it before, so you’re probably best doing your own research before repairing your picture with tape.

But I imagine that a good way of repairing a torn picture is to use a rather sturdy type of tape on the back of the picture and then to either use some kind of thin masking tape (which can be easily drawn or painted over) or possibly a thin non-shiny transparent kind of tape on the front of the picture.

As I said, I haven’t really had to do this before, so you are probably best doing some other research before trying this.

6) Distract people: I’ve talked about this technique in a lot more detail in another article, but sometimes the best way to handle a mistake in your picture isn’t to try to cover it over, but to add something to your painting to distract your audience for the mistake.

Basically, if there’s something in your picture that your audience’s eyes are immediately drawn to (and this can be as simple as someone’s face, an interesting plant etc….) then they are less likely to notice or care about mistakes in other parts of your picture. Use this fact to your advantage if you can.

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Anyway, I hope that this was useful 🙂