Review: “Resident Evil: City Of The Dead” By S. D. Perry (Novel)

Well, for the next novel in this month’s horror marathon, I thought that I’d take a look at a zombie novel that I’ve been meaning to re-read for ages. I am, of course, talking about S.D. Perry’s 1999 novel “Resident Evil: City Of The Dead”.

I can’t remember if I played the PC port of the original “Resident Evil 2” videogame before or after first reading this book during my early-mid teens. But, the original “Resident Evil 2” holds a special place in my heart for so many reasons (amongst other things, magazine articles about it were my first introduction to the zombie genre). So, I’ve been meaning to re-read this novel for a long time.

But I should probably point out that, addition to being a novelisation of the original “Resident Evil 2” videogame, this novel is also a sequel to Perry’s “Resident Evil: The Umbrella Conspiracy” and “Resident Evil: Caliban Cove“. Although it is possible to read most of this novel as a stand-alone book, a few of the extra scenes (not found in the game) will make a lot more sense if you’ve read Perry’s previous two books first.

So, let’s take a look at “Resident Evil: City Of The Dead”. Needless to say, this review may contain some SPOILERS.

This is the 1999 Pocket Books (US) paperback edition of “Resident Evil: City Of The Dead” that I read.

The novel begins with a collection of local newspaper articles from 1998, talking about police politics and mysterious murders in the US city of Racoon City. The novel then includes a brief (non-canonical) scene showing Jill Valentine returning to her apartment to pick up some stuff, before joining the surviving S.T.A.R.S team members as they prepare to flee to Europe.

The novel then begins the story of “Resident Evil 2”. A rookie cop called Leon Kennedy is running late for work after misjudging the traffic in New York. It is his first day on the force in Racoon City and he wants to make a good impression on Chief Irons. But, as he approaches the city, he notices that the streets are unusually deserted. Not long after that, he makes a grisly discovery.

Meanwhile, Claire Redfield, is riding her motorbike to Racoon City after not hearing from her brother Chris in several weeks. When she arrives in town, she decides to stop off in a local all-night diner, only to find that the cook has turned into a zombie and started devouring another member of staff.

As more zombies lurch towards her, Claire flees the restaurant and runs into Leon. Needless to say, both of them need to find some way to survive in this city of the dead….

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is that it is a really compelling zombie thriller novel that also does some clever stuff with the source material too. However, since it is a thriller, it doesn’t stand up to re-reading as much as I’d hoped (since the suspense works less well if you already know what will happen). Even so, it’s still a fast-paced, action-packed thrill ride of a story that fans of the zombie genre and/or “Resident Evil” will enjoy 🙂

In terms of the novel’s horror elements, they mostly consist of lots of well-written gory horror, some body horror/monster horror, some suspenseful horror and a bit of character-based horror. Whilst this novel isn’t really that frightening, it’s considerably gorier than the original videogame and is a bit like a fast-paced splatterpunk novel (such as Shaun Hutson’s “Erebus) in some ways 🙂

Still, as mentioned earlier, this novel is more of a thriller than a horror novel. And, in this regard, it works really well. Not only is there lots of suspense, multiple plot threads (with mini-cliffhangers), a fast-paced writing style and lots of dramatic fight scenes, but the novel also manages to keep some of the survival horror elements of the original games. In other words, the characters are sometimes low on ammo and/or wounded in some way or another.

In terms of how well it adapts the original “Resident Evil 2”, this novel does a really good job 🙂 The novel follows Leon’s “A” scenario and Claire’s “B” scenario, interweaving both storylines absolutely perfectly. Yes, there are a few small changes (eg: Leon has the magnum from the start of the story, the gun shop guy is already dead when Leon finds him etc…) but the novel manages to cram pretty much every major moment of the game’s story into one book. Plus, some extra stuff too.

In addition to adding a lot of extra characterisation to both the main characters and a few of the background characters (eg: Ada, Sherry, Annette, Chief Irons etc…), the novel also includes a few extra scenes and references that link in with the continuity of Perry’s novel series. Whilst the scene involving Jill Valentine has become non-canonical ever since “Resident Evil 3” was released, these extra scenes are a cool bonus for people who have read the previous two books. However, they may be a little bit confusing if you haven’t.

In terms of the writing, it’s really good. As you would expect, this novel’s third-person narration is mostly written in the kind of informal, fast-paced, “matter of fact” way that you’d expect from a gripping action-thriller novel. But, in a nod to the source material’s horror elements, there is also more formal/descriptive narration during some moments of horror too 🙂

In terms of length and pacing, this novel is fairly good. At 338 pages, it might seem a little long at first – but, considering that it is cramming two versions of the same game (eg: Leon and Claire’s campaigns) into just one novel, it is relatively short 🙂 Likewise, as I’ve mentioned before, this novel is a thriller novel, so expect a reasonably fast-paced story with some slightly slower suspenseful moments too. Surprisingly, this works really well, considering how slow-paced the original videogame is.

As for how this twenty year old novel has aged, it has aged really well. Although the story itself will probably evoke lots of 1990s/early 2000s nostalgia (and there isn’t a smartphone in sight 🙂 ), it is the kind of adaptation that could almost have been written today. It also has a level of gruesomeness that reminded me of the preview footage I’ve seen of the modern remake of “Resident Evil 2” (yes, I write these reviews quite far in advance.)

All in all, whilst the novel’s thriller elements work better when you read this novel for the very first time, it is still a really great zombie thriller novel 🙂 Not only does it cram the whole of “Resident Evil 2” into just one book, but it also adds lots of extra stuff and is also more of an intense experience (eg: pacing, horror etc..) than the original videogame is too 🙂 Even so, you need to read Perry’s previous two “Resident Evil” books to get the most out of this one.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would just get a five.

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Review: “Aliens: Criminal Enterprise” By S. D. Perry (Novel)

Well, it’s been a while since I last read an “Aliens” novel. And, since I wanted a fairly quick and relaxing novel, I decided to take a look at one of the second-hand “Aliens” novels that I bought several weeks earlier, namely S.D.Perry’s 2008 novel “Aliens: Criminal Enterprise”.

Interestingly, you can probably also enjoy this novel if you haven’t seen any of the “Alien” films. Although knowing a few basic things about the franchise’s famous monsters will probably make this novel slightly more enjoyable, they aren’t really the main focus of the story in the way that they are in most of the other “Aliens” novels that I’ve read.

So, let’s take a look at “Aliens: Criminal Enterprise”. Needless to say, this review may contain some SPOILERS.

This is the 2008 Dark Horse (US) paperback edition of “Aliens: Criminal Enterprise” that I read.

The novel begins with a man called Tommy Chase awakening from cryo-sleep after dreaming about his unhappy childhood. Tommy is a professional pilot who has agreed to run one job for a group of drug smugglers in order to help out his delinquent brother, Pete, who has got into trouble with them. Whilst Pete awakens from cryo-sleep, two of the crew members, Lee and Moby, want Tommy to land the ship quickly.

The ship lands on Fantasia, an illegally-terraformed planet owned by a drug baron called Msomi and run by one of his lieutenants called Trace. The planet is mostly used as a manufacturing facility and somewhere for wanted members of the gang to hide out until the heat dies down. As an added security measure, all of the areas outside of the main facility are swarming with vicious alien creatures that Msomi has imported onto the planet.

Meanwhile, on the surface, a man called Ray is lying in wait with a team of henchmen. Ray and Trace have fallen out in the past, and he plans to get even by downing the next outgoing cargo ship with an EMP, stealing the contents and framing Trace for the theft.

Whilst all of this is going on, a ship owned by the Neo-Pharm corporation is lurking near Fantasia. Msomi’s operation has been skimming or diverting chemicals from them. So, a team of mercenaries, led by an ex-military ex-cop called Kaye are preparing for a combat raid on the planet….

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is that the second half of it is better than the first half. In other words, whilst this novel does become really gripping, it takes a while to set everything up. Although this is a short novel, there are three plot threads and at least 10-20 characters. But, if you stick with this book during the earlier parts, then there is a really good payoff.

Interestingly, unlike several of the other “Aliens” novels that I’ve read, this novel is more of a crime thriller novel than a sci-fi or horror novel. Although there is some sci-fi stuff here (eg: illegal terraforming, futuristic drugs, spaceships, EMP weapons etc..) and there are a few horror elements (eg: the alien monsters, some gory moments etc..), the emphasis is firmly on the story’s crime and thriller elements.

In other words, whilst the aliens are a threatening background detail (and something for the characters to fight or avoid sometimes), they aren’t really the main focus of this story. This is more of a story about what happens when two rival groups of criminals and a band of corporate mercenaries collide with each other. Still, this makes a refreshing change from the usual “evil scientists and their research projects” plots that turn up in quite a few of the “Aliens” novels.

And, as a thriller, this novel works reasonably well. Whilst I found that the novel only really started to get gripping a little under halfway through, there’s a good mixture of drama, suspense and fast-paced action scenes. Likewise, thanks to the fact that nothing quite goes to plan for any of the characters, there’s a real sense of tension about who will survive and who won’t.

This novel also uses the technique (which I’ve also seen in Jonathan Maberry’s “Fall Of Night) of adding impact to various scenes by showing the same events multiple times from the “perspective” of different characters. Surprisingly, this works really well and – since the novel uses a third-person perspective throughout – it doesn’t really get confusing or annoying either.

In terms of the characters, they’re fairly well-written. But, whilst several of the characters get a decent amount of backstory and/or characterisation and many of them have realistic motivations and flaws, one of the problems with this story is that there are too many characters. Although the story mostly focuses on a few characters, the time spent introducing all of the characters can slow down the earlier parts of the story slightly. Even so, many of the background characters are well-written enough to make you care about them.

As for the writing, the novel’s third-person narration is pretty standard gritty sci-fi thriller stuff. In other words, the narration uses a rather “matter of fact” style that is fairly readable. Although the narration in this novel doesn’t flow quite as quickly as it does in Perry’s awesome “Resident Evil” novels, it still works well.

In terms of length and pacing, this novel is a bit of a mixed bag. At a gloriously efficient 222 pages in length, this story doesn’t feel too long. However, for a thriller novel, it takes quite a while to really get started. Yes, the earlier parts of the story build suspense and introduce both the premise and the large cast of characters, but the story doesn’t really turn into a truly gripping fast-paced action-packed thriller novel until a little under halfway through.

All in all, this is a fairly decent sci-fi crime thriller novel. Even though I found the second half of it to be more gripping than the first half, it is still a fairly enjoyable novel. But, if you’re looking for a thrilling “Aliens” novel with a bit more horror, then check out Perry’s “Aliens: The Labyrinth” instead.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get about a four.

Review: “Resident Evil: Caliban Cove” By S.D.Perry (Novel)

Well, although I’d planned to review a different novel today, I didn’t really get along with that novel – so, I decided to re-read S.D.Perry’s 1998 novel “Resident Evil: Caliban Cove” instead 🙂 This was a novel that I first read at some point during my teenage years and, intriguingly, it’s an original spin-off story rather than a direct novelisation of one of the classic “Resident Evil” videogames.

So, although this novel is a sequel to Perry’s “Resident Evil: The Umbrella Conspiracy“, it is sort of a stand-alone story. There are lots of recaps near the beginning and the main story is reasonably self-contained. However, it is worth taking the statement on the blurb (that this novel bridges the gap between the first two “Resident Evil” videogames) with a pinch of salt.

So, let’s take a look at “Resident Evil: Caliban Cove”. Needless to say, this review may contain some SPOILERS.

This is the 1998 Pocket Books (US) paperback edition of “Resident Evil: Caliban Cove” that I read.

The novel is set in the American city of Racoon City. Following the local S.T.A.R.S (Special Tactics And Rescue Service) team’s recent mission inside the zombie-filled Spencer mansion, there has been an official cover up by the nefarious Umbrella Corporation. The team have been discredited in the press and are suspended, pending an investigation.

Team medic Rebecca Chambers travels to Barry Burton’s house to meet up with the rest of the team and plan what to do next. When she arrives, Barry introduces her to a member of another S.T.A.R.S team called David Trapp. David is an old friend of Barry’s and has agreed to help him gather evidence against Umbrella. As such, David suggests a covert mission to infiltrate an Umbrella facility in Maine called Caliban Cove.

However, before the team can finish planning the mission, masked henchmen start shooting at Barry’s house. After a firefight that wounds Barry, the team flee to the abandoned house of their cowardly pilot Brad Vickers and lie low. After a while, they decide that – due to her scientific expertise – Rebecca should travel to Maine with David in order to investigate the mysterious Caliban Cove facility…..

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is that, whilst it gets off to a reasonably slow start, it’s a fairly good sci-fi/horror thriller novel. However, it is at least slightly different in style and tone to the videogames it takes inspiration from. On it’s own merits, it’s still a fairly good novel, but don’t go into this novel expecting “Resident Evil 1.5” or anything like that.

One of the most noticeable differences are the novel’s horror elements. Whilst this novel still includes a few gruesome moments of grisly zombie horror, don’t expect the kind of all-out gorefest that Perry offered in “Resident Evil: The Umbrella Conspiracy”. Instead, the majority of this novel’s horror elements consist of suspenseful horror, character-based horror and medical/scientific horror.

The story’s attitude towards monster design is pretty interesting too. The main “monster” of the story is a megalomaniacal scientist called Griffiths who has refined the zombie virus to the point where he can use it to control the zombies. Whilst this does result in some rather silly elements (eg: teams of zombies with machine guns), it is used to brilliantly chilling effect in the scenes showing how Griffiths has turned some of his co-workers into zombified slaves.

The novel’s thriller elements are pretty interesting too, with slightly more focus on suspense and exploration than combat. For the most part, this works reasonably well, with the suspense being increased via things like David’s team losing their boat, the squads of armed zombies prowling the grounds or the fact that a character starts slowly succumbing to the zombie virus.

However, the novel’s suspense is undercut somewhat by the fact that David’s team stays together for most of the story. One of the things that made the original games so suspenseful was the fact that the characters are frequently separated from each other and, for the most part, this novel doesn’t include too much of this. Likewise, the reader also gets to see a lot of Griffiths’ evil schemes before the other characters do, which kind of ruins the mystery slightly.

Like in the videogames, the characters also have to solve a series of puzzles in order to progress. Although there is an explanation for these puzzles (eg: a scientist hid something in the zombie training area), they seem a little bit more random and contrived than usual. In other words, they seem more like an episode of “The Crystal Maze” than a natural part of the story. Even so, the glorious silliness of these parts of the story is wonderfully reminiscent of the classic “Resident Evil” games.

In terms of the characters, they’re fairly good. In addition to an extended cameo from series regulars Barry Burton, Jill Valentine and Chris Redfield at the beginning, the novel mostly focuses on Rebecca Chambers – and adds some extra depth to a character who was, at the time the novel was written, little more than a background character in the first videogame.

Likewise, the new characters (eg: David and his teammates Karen, John and Steve) are all reasonably well-written and, of course, Griffiths is a brilliantly creepy villain too. Whilst you shouldn’t expect ultra deep characterisation, there’s enough characterisation here to make you care about the characters.

In terms of the writing, Perry’s third-person narration is a reasonably good mixture of informal fast-paced thriller narration and more descriptive narration. Since the novel focuses on Rebecca, there’s a little bit more scientific jargon in this story than you might expect. Even so, the narration fits the story really well and helps to keep everything compelling.

In terms of length and pacing, this novel is fairly good. At 242 pages, this novel is gloriously concise and can be enjoyed in just a few hours 🙂 The novel’s pacing is mostly fairly good, consisting of lots of slower moments of suspense punctuated by frantic moments of action and horror. However, the first forty pages or so of this novel (which mostly consist of recaps, dialogue etc…) are far too slow-paced for a story of this type. A good thriller novel should start with something thrilling.

As for how this twenty-one year novel has aged, it has aged reasonably well. Although there are possibly a couple of mildly dated descriptions, the story is both timelessly gripping and wonderfully ’90s at the same time. Everything from the random silliness of some parts of the story, to the 1990s suburbia setting of the novel’s early scenes, to the story’s “classic Resident Evil”-style elements are a wonderful source of ’90s nostalgia 🙂

All in all, whilst this novel is kind of like “Resident Evil lite”, it’s both a reasonably fun (if a little silly) spin-off story and a fairly suspenseful sci-fi/horror thriller novel. If you’re a fan of the series, then this novel is an interesting addition to it.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would just about get a four.

Review: “Resident Evil: The Umbrella Conspiracy” By S. D. Perry (Novel)

Well, a while after I finished the previous novel I’d reviewed, I was still in the mood for some relaxing literary comfort food. Naturally, my thoughts turned back to an old favourite of mine that I’ve been meaning to re-read for ages. I am, of course, talking about S.D.Perry’s 1998 novel “Resident Evil: The Umbrella Conspiracy”.

This is a novel that I first discovered when I was about thirteen or fourteen and, along with classic 1980s splatterpunk horror novels like Shaun Hutson’s “Erebus“, it showed me how utterly awesome novels can be 🙂 Yes, I’d read other novels before then, but these old 1980s/90s horror novels were the things that really got me interested in reading (and writing too).

Not only that, S.D.Perry’s “The Umbrella Conspiracy” (and it’s sequels) were based on the classic “Resident Evil” games – which were one of my favourite computer/video game series at the time. Perry’s novels were everything that my younger self had really wanted these slow-paced, atmospheric survival horror games to be – fast-paced, ultra-gruesome, pulse-pounding thrillers.

So, yes, this novel made quite an impression on me when I was younger 🙂 But, I was curious to see how I’d react to it now that I actually am one of the “mature readers” which the patronising content warning on the back cover recommends the book for.

So, let’s take a look at “The Umbrella Conspiracy”. Needless to say, this review may contain SPOILERS.

This is the 1998 Pocket Books (US) paperback edition of “Resident Evil: The Umbrella Conspiracy” that I re-read 🙂

The novel begins in the near-future year of 1998 (the original videogame came out in 1996), with a series of newspaper reports describing a series of mysterious grisly deaths in the forests surrounding the American city of Racoon City. The reports speculate that cannibals or wild animals are behind the horrific killings.

With mounting concern about the deaths, the local police chief authorises the force’s elite special tactics units (“S.T.A.R.S”) to go in and investigate. But, when Bravo team loses radio contact with HQ, S.T.A.R.S leader Albert Wesker decides to send Alpha team into the forest. As their helicopter gets closer to the forest, they notice a pall of smoke from a crashed helicopter. Bravo team’s helicopter!

After landing near the crashed chopper, Alpha team notices that it is completely abandoned. During a search of the surrounding woodland, Alpha team soon find the dismembered remains of one member of Bravo team. But, seconds later, they are menaced by ferocious mutant dogs. Fleeing for their lives, Alpha team find a disused mansion and take shelter inside. But, far from being a sanctuary, they have unknowingly entered the world of survival horror…..

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is that, even though I’ve read it before and even though I’m very familiar with the game it’s based on, it was still just about gripping enough for me to read all of it within a single day. Yes, this novel will be more suspenseful and dramatic if you haven’t played the game. But, even if you know everything about the story, then it’s still a fairly atmospheric and gripping novel.

And, although this novel isn’t that scary, it’s still a brilliant horror novel. Not only do the earlier parts of the novel build up ominous suspense quite well, but the novel’s creepy mansion setting also has the kind of gloomy, claustrophobic atmosphere that you would expect too. Plus, as mentioned earlier, this novel turns the gruesome elements of the source material up to eleven – giving this novel the macabre, vicious and grisly atmosphere that the original game lacked somewhat.

Likewise, this novel works really well as a thriller novel too. Since the main characters quickly find themselves separated when they enter the mansion, this allows the novel to jump between different areas and include lots of mini-cliffhangers. In addition to this, the main characters are frequently menaced by an assortment of zombies and mutant monsters, which gives the story much more of an action-packed feel. This fast-paced combat is also expertly contrasted with slower moments of puzzle-solving, suspense and characterisation too. Seriously, this is a thriller novel 🙂

As for how good an adaptation it is, it’s a really great one. Since “Resident Evil” is more of a story/puzzle/exploration-based game than an action game, it translates really well to a novel format – with Perry also being able to expand on all of the characters’ backstories in a way that really makes you care about them.

In addition to this, the novel also cleverly interweaves the game’s two campaigns (Jill’s campaign and Chris’ campaign), allowing the story to include many of the best moments from both of them. Plus, a few of the game’s signature lines of dialogue/text (eg: “You were almost a Jill Sandwich”, “…pecked to death by crows”, “Itchy. Tasty” etc…) also make an appearance too 🙂

The novel also takes a few interesting creative liberties which really help to keep the reader on their toes too. Not only does a mysterious new character called Trent (who is expanded upon more in Perry’s “Resident Evil: Underworld”, if I remember rightly) make a couple of cryptic appearances, but there are also a few amusing moments – such as Jill taking a much more common sense attitude towards a few of the game’s contrived puzzles (eg: just shattering the glass in the statue room, just climbing down the outdoor lift shaft etc..) too.

As for the writing, it’s really good. Perry’s third-person narration strikes just the right balance between being atmospherically descriptive and grippingly fast-paced. It’s written in a fast-paced, informal “matter of fact” way that allows you to blaze through the whole thing in a single day – but there’s enough description and formality to really give the story a sense of depth (compared to the game). In classic splatterpunk fashion, many of the novel’s most elaborate descriptions are also often reserved for moments of grisly, grotesque horror too 🙂

In terms of length and pacing, this novel is really great 🙂 Not only is it an efficient 262 pages in length, but the novel’s pacing is utterly brilliant too – with a really good contrast between fast-paced action scenes and slower moments of suspense and characterisation. Seriously, even if you know the story by heart, then this novel is still fairly gripping.

As for how this twenty-one year old novel has aged, it’s aged really well. Yes, there are a few obviously “90s” elements (such as a “futuristic” PDA that is more primitive than a modern smartphone) but, for the most part, this novel has lost none of it’s atmosphere, intensity and drama. Plus, of course, if you’ve played the original “Resident Evil” game, then this novel is a wonderful nostalgia-fest too 🙂

All in all, this novel is an absolutely brilliant adaptation of “Resident Evil” 🙂 If you’ve never played the game, then the story will be a lot more suspenseful. If you have played the game, then this novel is a deeper, more expanded and more intense version of a familiar story 🙂 Regardless, it’s a wonderfully gripping horror thriller novel. Yes, whilst it didn’t quite evoke the feeling of wide-eyed awe that I felt when I read this novel for the very first time, it’s still a very gripping and well-written novel.

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would just about get a five.

Review: “Aliens: The Labyrinth” By S. D. Perry (Novel)

Well, it’s been a little while since I last read a horror novel. So, after searching through some of my piles of books, I found an old copy of S.D.Perry’s 1996 novel “Aliens: The Labyrinth”. Although I really enjoyed Perry’s novelisations of the “Resident Evil” videogames when I was a teenager, I also had vague memories of enjoying a couple of “Aliens” novels back then too.

Since I initially wasn’t sure whether I’d already read this novel before (although about two-thirds of the way through, I realised that I had), I thought that I’d check it out.

So, let’s take (another) look at “Aliens: The Labyrinth”. Needless to say, this review will contain some SPOILERS.

This is the 1999 Millennium (UK) paperback reprint of “Aliens: The Labyrinth” (1996) that I read.

“Aliens: The Labyrinth” tells a self-contained sci-fi horror/thriller story that is set in the universe of the “Alien” films. The story begins with a military scientist called Colonel Doctor Crespi awakening from suspended animation after a long space voyage.

Officially, he is being dropped off at a remote research station in order to help out with Dr.Church’s scientific research. However, he has been given secret orders to seize command of the station due to unspecified worries about what is happening there.

Of course, it doesn’t take Crespi long to realise that Dr.Church is not only performing cruel experiments involving xenomorphs (the bloodthirsty alien monsters from the “Alien” films) but that he actually seems to enjoy his work too….

One of the first things that I will say about this novel is that, like a hungry xenomorph, it really creeps up on you. Basically, this novel gets much better as it goes along. When I started reading it, I initially found myself rolling my eyes and thinking “I’d probably enjoy this book a lot more if I was fourteen” but, near the end of the novel, I found myself recoiling with horror – yet spurred on by adrenaline to read more. Seriously, this is one of those novels where first impressions aren’t everything.

As for the sci-fi elements of this story, they work reasonably well. Not only is this novel set in a sparsely-described, but convincingly futuristic, location – but it also uses the classic sci-fi technique of occasionally dropping futuristic terms into the narration in order to immerse the reader.

Plus, of course, it’s a story about science gone horribly awry. You don’t get more sci-fi than that. In addition to this, the scientific ethics-based elements of the story are also explored in an utterly chilling flashback scene where the xenomorphs are shown performing vaguely similar experiments on humans, for an arguably more sympathetic reason.

The novel’s thriller elements work fairly well too. Although the earlier parts of the novel are a fairly standard mystery thriller, with a few fairly “ordinary” action-thriller moments thrown in every now and then to keep things interesting, the story eventually builds to a grippingly intense, visceral, adrenaline-fuelled climax that is an example of the thriller genre at it’s very best. So, yes, it only has one really gripping action-thriller segment, but what a segment it is!

As for the horror elements in this story, they work astonishingly well. At first, the novel isn’t particularly scary. The earlier scenes involving the xenomorphs seem to be gloriously cheesy in the way that you’d expect a silly monster movie involving a megalomaniacal scientist to be. But, as the novel progresses, other types of horror start to appear and you suddenly realise that the earlier scenes were there to lull you into a false sense of security!

Seriously, I was genuinely creeped out and grossed out by parts of this book. This is because it doesn’t just rely on silly monster-based scares and splatterpunk-esque gory horror, it also includes things like body horror, emotional horror, scientific horror, character-based horror, taboo-based horror, bleak nihilism and other such things. Seriously, it’s been years since a horror novel has made me literally recoil with horror.

All of this horror is also balanced out by some absolutely brilliant moments of dark comedy, mostly revolving around Dr. Church’s eccentricities. Seriously, this novel is worth reading just to read the scene where Church decides to take one of his pet xenomorphs for a stroll through the station’s corridors whilst humming a jaunty tune.

The narration in this novel is kind of interesting. Initially, I thought that the rather informal third-person narration was somewhat “shallow” and eye-rollingly immature (seriously, the narration uses a lot of four-letter words). But, as the story progressed, the narrative style began to make a lot more sense. Once the novel reaches it’s adrenaline-pumping climax, the informal narration really helps to ramp up the intensity a lot. Seriously, if the later parts of this book were narrated in a more traditional formal way, they wouldn’t have half the impact that they do. So, yes, the slightly informal narrative style works – although it takes a little bit of getting used to.

Best of all, at just 210 pages, this novel is efficient. There is barely a wasted moment in this novel and this really helps to keep the story flowing at a decent pace. Combined with the informal narration, this means that this novel is as enjoyable to read as watching a good sci-fi horror movie is. This book is reassuringly short easy reading that will make you feel decidedly uneasy.

The novel’s main characters are surprisingly well-written. Although they all initially seem to be two-dimensional stock characters who all have tragic backstories, they become more complex and compelling characters as the story goes on. Like with a lot of things about this book, the characters get better and more sophisticated as the story progresses. Seriously, this is the kind of novel that can make a background character into the main character in one part of the story and make that part of the story infinitely more dramatic and gripping as a result.

In terms of how this 23 year old novel has aged, it has aged ridiculously well. Seriously, if this novel was published for the first time today, you probably wouldn’t be able to tell that it was actually from 1996. It’s timeless.

All in all, this is a novel that will really catch you by surprise. Yes, it initially seems like a story that is about as scary as a kitten, written for immature audiences and populated by cardboard characters. But, this is all there to lull you – experienced horror novel reader- into a false sense of security. If you stick with this book, then you’ll find that it’s a lot scarier, a lot more gripping and a bit more sophisticated than you initially thought!

If I had to give it a rating out of five, it would get four and a half.